Cicero: De Oratore

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Cambridge University Press, Mar 10, 2011 - History - 346 pages
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Cicero's De Oratore is one of the masterpieces of Latin prose. A literary dialogue in the Greek tradition, it was written in 55 BCE in the midst of political turmoil at Rome, but reports a discussion 'concerning the (ideal) orator' that supposedly took place in 90 BCE, just before an earlier crisis. Cicero features eminent orators and statesmen of the past as participants in this discussion, presenting competing views on many topics. This edition of Book III is the first since 1893 to provide a Latin text and full introduction and commentary in English. It is intended to help advanced students and others interested in Roman literature to comprehend the grammar and appreciate the stylistic nuances of Cicero's Latin, to trace the historical, literary, and theoretical background of the topics addressed, and to interpret Book III in relation to the rest of De Oratore and to Cicero's other works.
  

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I restrict myself to one passage,concerning the difference between the Ionian seacoast and the Tuscan coast: "Barbarus" means 'non-Greek in language'., not 'barbarous',. ...superum mare [Ionium] Graecum … et portuosum, oratores autem in inferum hoc, Tuscum et barbarum, scopulosum atque infestum… Like the rivers, (science) scientists flow from the Appenines down to the Ionian Sea, rich in seaports and Greek in language, so do orators flow to the Tuscan sea, rocky, stormy and Latin in language…
..http://books.google.com/books?id=lmU2Rm2Oo_8C&pg=PA161&lpg=PA161&dq=cicero++ionian&source=bl&ots=DhWkLHyXrh&sig=dfcGVjey6Qykpl_frKbH9x3bwWw&hl=en&sa=X&ei=S2VxUq_4HKH7yAGVj4GQBg&ved=0CGoQ6AEwCQ#v=onepage&q=cicero%20%20ionian&f=false
 

Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
SIGLA
51
M TVLLI CICERONIS DE ORATORE LIBER III
55
COMMENTARY
101
APPENDIX 1 SUPPLEMENTARY TEXTS
326
APPENDIX 2 ORATIO
330
APPENDIX 3 LOCI LOCI COMMUNES
331
APPENDIX 4 OUTLINE OF DE ORATORE 3
333
REFERENCES
334
Index
340
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Born in Arpinum on January 3, 106 B.C., Marcus Tullius Cicero was a Roman orator, writer, and politician. In Rome, Cicero studied law, oratory, philosophy, and literature, before embarking on a political career. Banished from Rome in 59 B.C. for the execution of some members of the Catiline group, Cicero devoted himself to literature. Cicero was pardoned by Julius Caesar in 47 B.C., and returned to Rome to deliver his famous speeches, known as the "Philippics," urging the senate to declare war on Marc Antony. Cicero's chief works, written between 46 and 44 B.C., can be classified in the categories of philosophical works, letters, and speeches. The letters, edited by his secretary Tiro, showcase a unique writing style and charm. The most popular work of the period was De Officiis, a manual of ethics, in which Cicero espoused fundamental Christian values half a century before Christ. Cicero was murdered in Formiae, Italy, on December 4, 43 B.C., by Antony's soldiers after the triumvirate of Antony, Lepidus, and Octavius was formed.

David Mankin is Associate Professor of Classics at Cornell University, New York, where he teaches Latin language and literature, Greek epic and mythology, and Roman civilization. He has published articles and reviews on Roman Republican and Augustan literature and history, and is the author of Horace: Epodes (1995) in the same series.