Truceless War: Carthage's Fight for Survival, 241 to 237 Bc

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BRILL, 2007 - History - 286 pages
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The revolt of Carthage's mercenaries and oppressed Libyan subjects in 241-237 BC nearly ended her power and even existence. This 'truceless' war, unrivalled for its savagery, was fought over most of Punic North Africa and spread to Sardinia. It brought to power in Carthage Hamilcar Barca, father of Hannibal, whose generalship-though flawed-was critical to Carthage's final victory. The main narrative, by the Greek historian Polybius a century later, is vividly evocative (inspiring Flaubert's novel "Salammbo") yet repeatedly unclear on military and geographical details, the extent and structure of the rebel coalition, and chronology. "Truceless War" analyses Polybius and other sources to present a coherent and absorbing study of the war's causes and events, and of Polybius' historiographical methods.
  

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Contents

Prologue
xiii
Map
xxii
Gisco
1
The army of Sicily
6
Politics policies and politicians at Carthage
13
The army of Sicily at Carthage
25
Sicca
40
The talks at Tunes
51
Sardinia rebels
154
The killing of Gisco
160
Disasters and defections
173
The siege of Carthage
188
The Saw
197
The crosses at Tunes
219
Hamilcar and Hanno
229
Mathos end
235

Mutiny
63
Libya revolts
77
Hanno in charge
87
Hamilcars first victory
107
Hamilcar trapped
125
The Libyans
139
Enter Naravas
146
Victory and humiliation
248
A balancesheet
253
Polybius and other sources
263
Chronology of the War
275
Bibliography
277
Index
283
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

Dexter Hoyos has written extensively on Roman and Carthaginian history in the third Century BC, including the history of Hannibal's family and most recently, with John Yardley, a translation and commentary on Livy's books 21ľ30, Hannibal's War (Oxford World's Classics).

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