And Tango Makes Three

Front Cover
Simon and Schuster, Jun 1, 2005 - Juvenile Nonfiction - 32 pages
497 Reviews
When male penguins Silo and Roy attempt to hatch an egg-shaped rock and find no success in their efforts, the zookeepers decide to place a fertilized penguin egg in their cage and end up with little baby Tango, in an amusing tale based on a true story from the Central Park Zoo.
  

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User ratings

5 stars
283
4 stars
132
3 stars
53
2 stars
20
1 star
9

Easy to read with nice graphics. - Goodreads
Yay for ending bigotry in children's books! - Goodreads
Still a better love story than Twilight. - Goodreads
Lovely little story with beautiful illustrations. - Goodreads
I love how the illustrations aren't cartoonish at all. - Goodreads
A little disappointed in the ending. - Goodreads

Review: And Tango Makes Three

User Review  - Becky B - Goodreads

While all the other penguins pair off in boy-girl duos, Roy and Silo, two boy penguins don't follow suit. A zoo keeper decides they are in love and gives them an abandoned egg to hatch. Picked this up ... Read full review

Review: And Tango Makes Three

User Review  - Chris Young - Goodreads

Two male penguins fall in love and care for an egg in the Central Park Zoo. The gold standard for children's books dealing with homosexuality of all I have read so far, perhaps because it is a true ... Read full review

All 10 reviews »

About the author (2005)

Justin Richardson and Peter Parnell are the authors of the award winning picture book And Tango Makes Three.  Richardson is a psychiatrist on the faculty of Columbia and Cornell.  Parnell is a playwright whose plays have been produced on and Off-Broadway.  They live in New York City with their daughter, Gemma.

Peter Parnell is the co-author, with Justin Richardson, of And Tango Makes Three.  Peter is a playwright whose plays have been produced at the Public Theater and Playwrights Horizons in New York City, the Mark Taper Forum in Los Angeles, and the Seattle Repertory Company, among others. His play QED was produced on Broadway. He has written extensively for televison as a producer for both The West Wing and The Guardian; he has also written episodes of Maurice Sendak's series Little Bear. He lives in New York City.

Henry Cole has illustrated more than fifty books for children including The Leprechaun's Gold by Pamela Duncan Edwards, Little Bo by Julie Andrews, and On Meadow Street, which he wrote. His first novel was A Nest for Celeste.