Water in buildings: an architect's guide to moisture and mold

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John Wiley & Sons, 2005 - Architecture - 270 pages
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The definitive guide to understanding and managing the effects of water on buildings
Water in Buildings: An Architect's Guide to Moisture and Mold is a detailed and highly useful reference to help architects and other design professionals create dry, healthy environments, without jeopardizing a project with poor liability management. Much more than a book of "quick fixes," this practical guide illuminates an essential understanding of the "whys" of moisture problems, including valuable information on how water behaves and how its performance can be anticipated and managed in building design.
With a special emphasis on water's role in creating mold, an issue of growing concern and liability, Water in Buildings offers the most up-to-date information on rainwater management, below-grade water management, foundations, wall and roof construction, mechanical systems, moisture, and much more! Providing authoritative guidance to designers and builders, this definitive guide features:
* Clear explanations of how water interacts with building materials and equipment
* An in-depth exploration of the paths of leaks
* Numerous case studies on such well-known structures as Mount Vernon, Independence Hall, and Wingspan (Frank Lloyd Wright)
* Numerous descriptive drawings and photographs

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Contents

SOURCES
5
SUMMARIES OF CHAPTERS
12
Water
33
Copyright

14 other sections not shown

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About the author (2005)

WILLIAM B. ROSE is a Research Architect at the Building Research Council at the University of Illinois. His research, which focuses on moisture and its effects on buildings, is used by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and other agencies. He serves as a consultant to museums and historic buildings on moisture problems, including Independence Hall, Frank Lloyd Wright's Unity Temple, and Thomas Jefferson's Poplar Forest. He has instructed hundreds of architects on the power of water through the American Institute of Architect's continuing education series, Water in Buildings.

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