Riches for the Poor: The Clemente Course in the Humanities

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W. W. Norton & Company, 1997 - Education - 273 pages
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"You've been cheated," Earl Shorris tells a classroom of poor people in New York City. "Rich people learn the humanities; you didn't. . . . It is generally accepted in America that the liberal arts and humanities in particular belong to the elite. I think you're the elite." In this groundbreaking work, Shorris examines the nature of poverty in America today. Why are people poor, and why do they stay poor? Shorris argues that they lack politics, or the ability to participate fully in the public world; knowing only the immediacy and oppression of force, the poor remain trapped and isolated. To test his theory, Shorris creates an experimental school teaching the humanities to poor people, giving them the means to reflect and negotiate rather than react. The results are nothing short of astonishing. Originally published in hardcover under the title New American Blues.
  

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Review: Riches for the Poor: The Clemente Course in the Humanities

User Review  - Kathryn - Goodreads

This is a book about the Clemente Course, which was the inspiration for the Bridge Program. Read full review

Contents

Richer Than Rockefeller
3
Definitions
12
Born for Each Other
25
The Golden Age of Poverty
34
The Surround of Force
40
The Mirror of Force
50
The Fallacy of Work
59
Citizenship by Exclusion
65
A Prison Epiphany
95
Radical Humanism
101
The Clemente Experiment Begins
118
The Bard Course
159
The Curriculum
173
Variations and SelfCriticism
216
Other Countries Other Cultures
230
A Dangerous Corollary
253

Across Cultures
78
Political Inventions
85

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About the author (1997)

Earl Shorris, author of many works of fiction & nonfiction, lives in New York & San Francisco.

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