Letters of Mary, Queen of Scots: Now First Published from the Originals, Collected from Various Sources, Private as Well as Public, with an Historical Introduction and Notes, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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H. Colburn, 1845
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Page xxv - You know very well, that the injury she has received is exceeding great, and her majesty will never forget it.
Page 218 - I pray you think and hold me in your grace as your own, who daily shall pray to God to send you happy and hasty deliverance of all troubles, not doubting but you would not then enjoy alone all your felicities, without remembering your own faithful to death, who shall not have any advancement or rest without you. And so I leave to trouble you, but commend you to God.
Page 206 - This day I received a letter from you by this bearer, whereby I perceive the thought you take of my health, which, thanks to God, is much better than it was at his departing, but not yet very strong, nor quit of the soreness of my side. It causes me to be more heavy and pensive than I would or need to be...
Page 39 - Stirling, when he received the name of Charles James. It was the Queen's pleasure that he should bear the name of James...
Page 206 - I will be about to use myself so, that, so far as God shall give me grace, you shall never have cause to diminish your good conceit and favour of me, while I shall esteem and respect you in all my doings so long as I live , as you would wish your own to do.
Page 24 - The provost and town of Edinburgh, having understood this tumult in our palace, caused ring their common bell, came to us in great number, and desired to have seen our presence...
Page 67 - I am now forced out of my kingdom, and driven to such straits that, next to God, I have no hope but in your goodness. I beseech you, therefore, my dearest sister, that I may be conducted to your presence, that I may acquaint you with all my affairs. In the...
Page 65 - Catherine) will have pity on me ; for, if you do not take me by force, 1 shall never go from hence, of that I am sure ; but, if you will please to send troops, all the Scotch will revolt against Mora and Mirton [Murray and Morton], if they have but the means of gathering themselves together. " I entreat you will give belief to this bearer, and hold me in your good graces...
Page 47 - Laws shall leave it to be done ; but in case any should presume directly or indirectly, openly, or under whatsoever Colour or Pretence, to hinder, hold back, or disturb the said Marriage, we shall, in that behalf, esteem, hold, and repute the Hinderers, Adversaries, or Disturbers thereof, as our common Enemies and evil Willers; and notwithstanding...
Page 86 - I particularly beg you to give him the same credit as you would to me, for he has proved himself my faithful servant, having delivered me from the hands of my mortal foes, at the peril of his life, and the sacrifice of his nearest ties of kindred. He desires, to the end, that he may continue to render me service, as he has begun to do, that he may remain for a time in your court, to wait for the assistance that may be provided for me. I entreat you to give him such entertainment as may make it manifest,...

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