Pictures from Brueghel and Other Poems: Collected Poems 1950-1962

Front Cover
New Directions Publishing, 1962 - American poetry - 184 pages
23 Reviews
This collection makes available work of one of our greatest American poets in the last decade of his life. The first section, Pictures from Brueghel, contains previously uncollected short poems, while the second and third parts are the complete texts of The Desert Music (1954) and Journey to Love (1955), originally published by Random House. In these books, Dr. Williams perfected his "variable foot" metric and achieved full mastery of the "American idiom" which was his lifelong first concern. Among the poems of this period is the long "Asphodel, That Greeny Flower" which W. H. Auden has called "one of the most beautiful love poems in the language." Pictures from Brueghel was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry only two months after William Carlos Williams' death on March 4, 1963.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
12
4 stars
8
3 stars
3
2 stars
0
1 star
0

Review: Pictures from Brueghel and Other Poems: Collected Poems, 1950-1962

User Review  - Naomi - Goodreads

Many splendid poems in this Pulitzer prize winning volume. I especially enjoyed the opening sequence that took me into several of Brueghel's paintings with different eyes. Read full review

Review: Pictures from Brueghel and Other Poems: Collected Poems, 1950-1962

User Review  - h - Goodreads

I really want to give this 3.5 stars. Some gems, some clunkers, but all WCW. Read full review

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1962)

Poet, artist, and practicing physician of Rutherford, New Jersey, William Carlos Williams wrote poetry that was experimental in form, ranging from imagism to objectivism, with great originality of idiom and human vitality. Credited with changing and directing American poetry toward a new metric and language, he also wrote a large number of short stories and novels. Paterson (1946--58), about the New Jersey city of that name, was his epic and places him with Ezra Pound of the Cantos as one of the great shapers of the long poem in this century. National recognition did not come early, but eventually Williams received many honors, including a vice-presidency of the National Institute of Arts and Letters (1952); the Bollingen Prize (1953); the $5,000 fellowship of the Academy of American Poets; the Loines Award for poetry of the National Institute of Arts and Letters (1948); and the Brandeis Award (1957). Book II of Paterson received the first National Book Award for poetry in 1949. Williams was named consultant in poetry in English to the Library of Congress for 1952--53. Williams's continuously inventive style anchored not only objectivism, the school to which he most properly belongs, but also a long line of subsequent poets as various as Robert Lowell, Frank O'Hara, and Allen Ginsberg. With Stevens, he forms one of the most important sources of a specifically American tradition of modernism. In addition to his earlier honors, Williams received two important awards posthumously, the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry (1963) and the Gold Medal for Poetry from the National Institute of Arts and Letters (1963).

Bibliographic information