The Psychology of Stalking: Clinical and Forensic Perspectives (Google eBook)

Front Cover
J. Reid Meloy
Academic Press, Aug 10, 1998 - Psychology - 327 pages
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The Psychology of Stalking is the first scholarly book on stalking ever published. Virtually every serious writer and researcher in this area of criminal psychopathology has contributed a chapter. These chapters explore stalking from social, psychiatric, psychological and behavioral perspectives. New thinking and data are presented on threats, pursuit characteristics, psychiatric diagnoses, offender-victim typologies, cyberstalking, false victimization syndrome, erotomania, stalking and domestic violence, the stalking of public figures, and many other aspects of stalking, as well as legal issues. This landmark text is of interest to both professionals and other thoughtful individuals who recognize the serious nature of this ominous social behavior.

Key Features:
* First scholarly book on stalking ever published
* Contributions from virtually all major researchers in field
* Discussion of what to do when being stalked
* Uses examples from recent publicized cases
  

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Contents

Case Example 1
166
Case Example 2
167
Case Example 3
168
Case Example 4
169
Case Example 6
170
Case Example 7
171
Case Example 9
172
Summary
173

Psychodynamics and Attachment Pathology
19
Final Thoughts
22
The Legal Perspective on Stalking
26
Evolution of the First Stalking Law
29
Californias Current Stalking Law
32
Probation and Parole
35
Associated Stalking Statues
36
The Crime of Terrorist Threats
37
The Madonna Stalking Case
38
The Media and the Jury
40
Conviction and Sentencing
42
Conclusion
43
Recent California Case Law
44
Terrorist Threat Cases
46
References
49
Developmental and Social Antecedents of Stalking
52
Attachment Theory
53
Object Relations Theory
55
Stalking and Attachment
57
Early Attachment Disruption A Predisposing Factor of Stalking
58
Adult Recent Loss A Precipitating Factor of Stalking
59
Fearful Attachment
61
Dismissing Attachment
62
Attachment and Psychopathology
64
Psychiatric Features of Stalkers
65
Summary
66
Psychiatric Diagnosis and the OffenderVictim Typology of Stalking
70
Psychiatric Diagnosis of Stalkers
71
The Threat Management Unit
76
StalkerVictim Types
77
Love Obsessional
78
Erotomanic
79
False Victimization Syndrome
80
Current Findings
82
References
84
The Archetypes and Psychodynamics of Stalking
86
Was Shakespeare a Stalker? A Modern Psychodynamic
89
Sexual Triangles Jealousy Competition Masochism Inadequacy and Inhibition
90
SelfObject Confusion Dependency and Distortions
92
SelfObject Confusion Dependency and Distortions
93
Threats and Predation to Control the Love Objects as a Defense against Psychological Decompensation
94
Letting Go
95
Psychodiagnoses and Psychodynamics of Stalking
96
Histrionic Personality Features
99
Borderline Personality Features
102
Antisocial Personality Features
103
Narcissistic Personality Features
105
Delusional Personality Features
110
References
112
The Victims of Stalking
114
Methodology
116
Limitations of the Study
117
Results
118
Men as Victims
120
Women as Victims
121
Perceived Motivations of Stalkers
122
Past and Current Stalking
124
Demographics of Stalking Victims
125
Stalker Demographics
128
Stalking Behaviors
132
Effects on the Victim
134
Conclusions
136
References
137
Stalking and Domestic Violence
140
Homicide Studies
141
Stalking in Battering Relationships
143
Identifying Women at High Risk
144
Reducing Risk for Battered Women
146
Batterer Typologies
148
Identifying Dangerous Domestic Violence Stalkers
149
The JurisMonitor Project
154
Psychological Techniques of Battering
155
Conclusions
159
References
160
The Stalking of Clinicians by Their Patients
164
Preventing Attacks on Public Officials and Public Figures A Secret Service Perspective
176
The Secret Service Exceptional Case Study Project
177
Population
178
Data Collection
180
ECSP Findings
182
Key Observations on Assassins
185
Two Case Studies
187
Summary and Conclusions
190
References
192
De Clerambault OnLine A Survey of Erotomania and Stalking from the Old World to the World Wide Web
194
Nomenclature and Diagnosis
196
Secondary Erotomania
198
Demographics Dangerousness and Dynamics
200
Dangerousness
202
Dynamics
205
Stalking
206
Case 1
208
Management
209
Erotomania in Cyberspace
210
Case 2
211
References
212
Cultural Factors in Erotomania and Obsessional Following
214
Theoretical Framework
215
Reality Testing
216
Case 1
217
Evaluating Culture Shock and Acculturation Stress
218
Case 2
219
Treatment Considerations
222
Summary
223
References
224
False Victimization Syndromes in Stalking
226
Review of Literature
228
FVS Physical Symptoms without a Known Physical Cause
231
False Crime Reports General Discussion
233
False Victimization Types Most Likely Encountered by Law Enforcement
242
FVS Type 3b Unknown Perpetrator
244
FVS Type 3b Unknown Perpetrator
246
FVS Known and Unknown Perpetrator Types Case Discussion
248
False Victimization Syndrome Descriptors
250
Enlistment of Others
251
Historical Clues
252
Reporting Rhythm
253
Situational Stressors
254
Suggestions for Further Research and Investigation
255
References
256
Stalking Erotomania and the Tarasoff Cases
258
Case History
259
Criminal Proceedings
269
Assessment of Dangerousness in a Tarasoff Situation
270
Summary
271
References
272
Applying Functional Analysis to Stalking Behavior
276
Research Commentary
278
Functional Analysis
281
Principles of Functional Analysis
282
Conducting a Functional Analysis
284
Applying Functional Analysis to Stalking Behavior
285
Functional Analysis of Other Stalking Behaviors of Interest
289
Conclusions
293
References
294
Threat Management of Stalking Cases
296
Case Study
299
Engagement and Intake
300
Victim Interviews
302
The Tapes
304
Background Investigation
305
Case and Risk Formulation
306
Intervention Strategy
308
Disposition of Subject
310
Decisions about Recommending Further Involvement of Interventions
311
Responding to the Most Serious Cases
312
Sample Listings of Investigative Resources for an InDepth Background Assessment Investigation
313
References
315
Index
318
Copyright

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About the author (1998)

Dr. Reid Meloy is a diplomate in forensic psychology of the American Board of Professional Psychology. He was Chief of the Forensic Mental Health Division for San Diego County, and now devotes his time to a private civil and criminal forensic practice, research, writing, and teaching. He is an associate clinical professor of psychiatry at the University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine, and an adjunct professor at the University of San Diego School of Law. He is also a Fellow of the Society for Personality Assessment, and is currently President of the American Academy of Forensic Psychology. In 1992 he received the Distinguished Contribution to Psychology as a Profession Award from the California Psychological Association.Dr. Meloy has authored or co-authored over 100 papers published in peer-reviewed psychiatric and psychological journals, and has written or edited four books. He is a sought after speaker and psychological consultant on various civil and criminal cases throughout the United States, most recently the Madonna stalking case and the Polly Klaas murder case. In 1997, he completed work as the forensic psychologist for the prosecution in United States vs. Timothy McVeigh and the United States vs. Terry Nichols.

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