Main Street (Google eBook)

Front Cover
P. F. Collier and Son Corporation, 1920 - City and town life - 451 pages
31 Reviews
In this classic satire of small-town America, beautiful young Carol Kennicott comes to Gopher Prairie, Minnesota, with dreams of transforming the provincial old town into a place of beauty and culture. But she runs into a wall of bigotry, hypocrisy and complacency. The first popular bestseller to attack conventional ideas about marriage, gender roles, and small town life, Main Street established Lewis as a major American novelist.
  

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Lisa.Johnson.James - LibraryThing

This being a classic, & also being a satire, I expected it to be funny. It wasn't. It was painfully slow in places, & I could have done without it deviating from the story every so often. Other than ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - bibliostuff - LibraryThing

Satirical novel depicting life in a small rural town during the 1910s. The female protagonist, Carol Milford is a liberal woman from St. Paul, Minnesota. She marries Will Kennicott, who takes her to ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

I
1
II
12
III
20
IV
31
V
54
VI
68
VII
81
VIII
93
XXI
250
XXII
262
XXIII
274
XXIV
287
XXV
306
XXVI
316
XXVII
323
XXVIII
326

IX
99
X
109
XI
124
XII
145
XIII
154
XIV
161
XV
176
XVI
195
XVII
205
XVIII
217
XIX
230
XX
240
XXIX
341
XXX
356
XXXI
368
XXXII
377
XXXIII
390
XXXIV
404
XXXV
411
XXXVI
418
XXXVII
425
XXXVIII
431
XXXIX
444
Copyright

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About the author (1920)

Harry Sinclair Lewis was born on February 7, 1885 in Minnesota. He was an American novelist, short-story writer, and playwright. In 1930, he became the first writer from the United States to receive the Nobel Prize in Literature. A lonely child, Lewis immersed himself in reading and diary writing. While studying at Yale University and living in writer Upton Sinclair's communal house, he wrote for Yale Literary Magazine and helped to build the Panama Canal. After graduating from Yale in 1908, Lewis began writing fiction, publishing 22 novels by the end of his career. His early works, while often praised by literary critics, did not reach popularity but with Main Street (1920), Babbitt (1922), Arrowsmith (1925), Elmer Gantry (1927), and Dodsworth (1929), Sinclair Lewis achieved fame as a writer. His style of choice was satire; he explored American small-town life, conformity, hypocrisy, and materialism. Sinclair Lewis was married and divorced twice. As his career wound down, he spent his later life in Europe and died in Rome on January 10, 1951.

Bibliographic information