Voting rights--and wrongs: the elusive quest for racially fair elections

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AEI Press, Jan 1, 2009 - Law - 316 pages
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In Voting Rights-and Wrongs: The Elusive Quest for Racially Fair Elections, Abigail Thernstrom explores the complex issues raised by the Voting Rights Act today. Thernstrom celebrates the landmark 1965 law that opened southern voting booths to African Americans-while challenging its evolution into a tool to create a racially fair distribution of political power. Federal law now requires states to draw majority-minority legislative districts, giving minority voters a uniquely sheltered status. Color-conscious policies were morally justified when the only alternative was the perpetuation of all-white or overwhelmingly white legislatures. Today, such race-conscious districting may create less-rather than more-integrated politics.

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Contents

Introduction
1
The Fundamentals
25
The Mess the Courts Have Made
47
Copyright

13 other sections not shown

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About the author (2009)

Abigail Thernstrom is a member of the Massachusetts State Board of Education, a commissioner on the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, and a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute in New York. She is the author of "Whose Votes Count? Affirmative Action and Minority Voting Rights" and, with her husband, Stephan, of "America in Black and White: One Nation, Indivisible.