Root Cellaring: Natural Cold Storage of Fruits & Vegetables (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Storey Publishing, Sep 1, 1991 - Cooking - 320 pages
24 Reviews
Anyone can learn to store fruits and vegetables safely and naturally with a cool, dark space (even a closet!) and the step-by-step advice in this book.
  

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Review: Root Cellaring: Natural Cold Storage of Fruits & Vegetables

User Review  - Sophia - Goodreads

This book completely revolutionized the way I see my own home! The Bubels opened my eyes to the possibilities we ALL have at our fingertips for storing our food. From fruits and veggies to nuts ... Read full review

Review: Root Cellaring: Natural Cold Storage of Fruits & Vegetables

User Review  - Kathy - Goodreads

I'm really impressed with how thorough, yet concise this book it. The chapters are short and divided in a way that you can skip to exactly the topic you need without missing out. I was afraid there ... Read full review

Contents

Starting Right With Storage Vegetables
1
Bringing in the Harvest
33
All the Winter Keepers and How to Treat Them
49
Food Cellars for Everyone
111
Heres What We Did
177
Recipes
243
Bibliography
283
Sources
287
Index
291
Copyright

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About the author (1991)

A Poland native, Mike Bubel grew up with his family using many of the techniques in their book. He and his wife Nancy have been gardening and root cellaring in Philadelphia, in small towns, and on their one acre non-working farm in Wellsville, Pennsylvania.

Co-author Nancy Bubel has been a gardening columnist for Country Journal magazine since 1975 and has written for Mother Earth News, Organic Gardening, Horticulture, Family Circle, Woman's Day and New Shelter magazines. She is a member of the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society and the Society for Economic Botany, and a life member of both the Seed Savers Exchange and the Friends of the Trees Society. She and her husband Mike have been gardening and root cellaring in Philadelphia, in small towns, and on their one acre non-working farm in Wellsville, Pennsylvania.

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