The Misfortunes of Elphin

Front Cover
BiblioBazaar, 2009 - History - 252 pages
2 Reviews
This is a pre-1923 historical reproduction that was curated for quality. Quality assurance was conducted on each of these books in an attempt to remove books with imperfections introduced by the digitization process. Though we have made best efforts - the books may have occasional errors that do not impede the reading experience. We believe this work is culturally important and have elected to bring the book back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide.

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Review: The Misfortunes of Elphin

User Review  - Dch3jac1 - Goodreads

Enjoyable slice of British/Welsh mythology with the usual amusing wordy Peacock digressions. Read full review

Review: The Misfortunes of Elphin

User Review  - Lucy - Goodreads

A pleasant enough reworking and mixing of some old British legends, interesting more for its place in the development of English Literature than for its own slight merits. It's lightly ironic, good-humoured, but ultimately trivial. An excellent drunk in there, though.... Read full review

About the author (2009)

The witty, erudite, quirky Peacock, renowned for his range of knowledge, was largely self-educated. While working at the East India Company as a clerk to support his invalid wife and children, he mastered Greek, Latin, Italian, French, and Welsh. In his youth he associated with a number of free-thinking intellectuals, including Shelley (who called him "Greeky Peaky" for his fondness of ancient Greek literature), Jeremy Bentham, and John Stuart Mill. Peacock's daughter married and later abandoned George Meredith, who expressed his anguish in the sonnet sequence Modern Love (1862) and his novels The Ordeal of Richard Feverel (1859) and The Egoist (1879). Peacock's own fiction parodied the fashionable excesses of taste for the supernatural, medieval, melancholy, and sensibility that appeared in the popular novels, poetry, and melodramas. He also parodied the writers themselves for their eccentricities and attitudinizing. In a series of novels written over a long creative life (he died at age 81), with titles caricaturing the fashion for castles and abbeys---Headlong Hall (1816), Melincourt (1817), Nightmare Abbey (1818), Crotchet Castle (1831), and Gryll Grange (1861), Peacock tried to show that the proper function of literature, as he said in Nightmare Abbey, was "to reconcile man as he is to the world as it is.

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