The Dilbert principle: a cubicle's-eye view of bosses, meetings, management fads & other workplace afflictions

Front Cover
Boxtree, Aug 26, 1996 - Comics & Graphic Novels - 336 pages
98 Reviews

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
31
4 stars
37
3 stars
20
2 stars
8
1 star
2

Didn't care for this style of writing. - Goodreads
Scott Adams shows a weakness for humerous prose. - Goodreads
... some nice puns, sarcastic comments.. - Goodreads
Writing about pictures is not funny. - Goodreads
The satire and parody in the book is just too good. - Goodreads

Review: The Dilbert Principle : A Cubicle's-Eye View of Bosses, Meetings, Management Fads & Other Workplace Afflictions (Dilbert: Business #1)

User Review  - Nandakishore Varma - Goodreads

I have worked in Engineering Consultancy organisations since 1993. Now I will let Dilbert speak for me. And finally, with apologies to the memory of Dian Fossey. Read full review

Review: The Dilbert Principle : A Cubicle's-Eye View of Bosses, Meetings, Management Fads & Other Workplace Afflictions (Dilbert: Business #1)

User Review  - Felicia - Goodreads

"When companies try to encourage creativity it's like a bear dancing with an ant. Sooner or later the ant will realize it's a bad idea, although the bear may not." As usual, Scott Adams is spot on ... Read full review

Contents

Big Opening
1
The Dilbert Principle
11
Humiliation
18
Copyright

24 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1996)

Scott Adams, Cartoonist Scott Adams was born and raised in Windham, New York in the Catskill Mountains. He received a B.A. in economics from Hartwick College, Oneonta, NY and an MBA from the University of California, Berkeley. He is also a certified hypnotist. Adams worked in a bank for eight years and, while a bank teller, was robbed twice at gunpoint. He also worked for Pacific Bell for nine years and describes both jobs as "humiliating and low paying jobs." It was during this time, that Adams created the character Dilbert. He was entertaining himself during meetings by drawing insulting cartoons of his co-workers and bosses. In 1988, he mailed some sample comic strips featuring Dilbert to some major cartoon syndicates. He was offered a contract and Dilbert was launched in approximately fifty papers in 1989. Adams began working on Dilbert full time as well as speaking, writing, doing interviews, and designing artwork for licensed products. Dilbert is published in over 1,200 newspapers and has a hard cover business book called "The Dilbert Principle.

Bibliographic information