Annual Report of the Indiana State Board of Agriculture, Volume 23 (Google eBook)

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State Board of Agriculture, 1882 - Agriculture
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Vols. for 1869- include Annual report of the Geological Survey of Indiana.
  

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Page 13 - Society, or ewer delegate therefrom, duly authorized, who shall, for the time being, be exofficio members of the State Board of Agriculture, for the purpose of deliberation and consultation, as to the wants, prospects and condition of the agricultural interests throughout the State...
Page 194 - ... of this act, shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and on conviction thereof shall be fined in the sum of fifty dollars for the first offense, and in the sum of one hundred dollars for each subsequent offense.
Page 179 - ... go beyond, an elevation of one hundred and seventy-five feet ! The maximum elevation of the tallest sycamore and tulip trees is probably not less than two hundred feet. Going into these primitive woods, we find symmetrical, solid trunks of six feet and upwards in diameter, and fifty feet, or more, long to be not uncommon, in half a dozen or more species ; while now and then we happen on one of those old sycamores, for which the rich alluvial bottoms of the western rivers are so famous, with a...
Page 179 - ... those old sycamores, for which the rich alluvial bottoms of the western rivers are so famous, with a trunk thirty or even forty, possibly fifty or sixty, feet in circumference, while perhaps a hundred feet overhead stretch out its great white arms, each as large as the biggest trunks themselves of most eastern forests, and whose massive head is one of those which lifts itself so high above the surrounding tree-tops. The tall, shaft-like trunks of pecans, sweet gums or ashes, occasionally break...
Page 217 - Bounded on the east by the Pennsylvania line, on the south by the Ohio river, to the mouth of the Great Miami river, on the west by a line drawn due north from the mouth of the Great Miami, aforesaid, and on the north by an east and west line, drawn through the southerly extreme of Lake Michigan...
Page 504 - ... while, on the other hand, a knowledge of the agricultural capabilities of any one district in which certain rocks are known to lie immediately beneath the soil, and of the agricultural practice suited to that district, will indicate the probable capabilities of any other tract in which the same kind of rock is known to appear on the surface, and of the kind of culture which may be most successfully applied to it.
Page 14 - At the first meeting of the council, after its organization, they shall elect a city clerk, who shall hold his office for the term of one year, and until his successor is elected and qualified.
Page 191 - ... but much more by palpable substances. Dust of every kind irritates, but not in an equal degree. Much, I conceive, depends on the size and figure of the particles which enter the airtube. The dust from the roads produces no apparent mischief, while the mason's chippings from the stone occasion serious and often fatal injury to his lungs. The dust from old iron, which is thrown off so copiously as to deposit a thick brown layer on the dress of the dealers in this article, produces no inconvenience...
Page 412 - The mutton on the arm or fore thigh should come quite to the knee; leg upright with heavy bone, being clear from superfluous skin with wool to fetlock, and may be mixed with gray 4 Breast broad and well forward, keeping the legs wide apart; girth or chest full and deep 10...
Page 414 - ... short, of medium size; eyes expressive; head should be well covered with wool to a point even with the eyes, without any appearance of horns; color of face dark brown 10 points.

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