The Cambridge modern history, Volume 7 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
The Macmillan Company, 1903 - History, Modern
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Contents

Colonial literature
60
CHAPTER III
70
Relations with the natives
76
Company of the West in the West Indies
86
law and the Company of the Indies
92
Education in French colonies
102
Strength of the French geographical position
108
CHAPTER IV
114
Collision in the West
120
CHAPTER V
144
Repeal of the Stamp Act
150
Hutchinsons letters
156
Schemes of conciliation
162
Washington made commanderinchief
167
Extension of the field of war
173
THE WAR OF INDEPENDENCE 17761783
175
Objection to the writs
179
Extension of Admiralty jurisdiction
185
Rights of legislation
191
Whig view The Virginia charters
197
Support in return for protection
203
Weakness of the American government
209
Burgoyne in difficulties
215
Clarkes campaigns in the Ohio valley
221
Capitulation of Yorktown
231
CHAP8 PAGES
235
State constitutions
237
Randolph and Patterson resolutions
247
National government
250
Argument from experience and history
256
Money bills Heated debate on union
262
Periodical census Slaves 268
270
Sixth resolution Enumeration of powers
276
Importation of slaves Navigation laws
282
Special committee on election of the President
290
Appointment of judges 2968
296
Final Articles of the Constitution
302
Differences between the United States and Europe 687
321
THE WAR OF 18121815
336
Battle of Lundys Lane
343
CHAPTER XI
349
The Peace Demand for Protection
355
Contents
360
Slavery question Missouri
361
Revolution in Spain
367
the Caucus
373
CHAPTER XVI
378
Presidential election The AntiMasons
379
CHAPTER XIII
405
The States and the Union
411
The old order changing
421
Douglas and popular sovereignty
427
KansasNebraska Act
428
Grant and Sherman 614
515
Shermans march on Atlanta 621
521
Burning of Columbia
529
Lincoln with Grant at City Point 637
537
Capture of Davis Final surrenders
543
CHAPTER XVII
549
CHAPTER XVIII
568
Lincoln and Vallandigham 674
576
Fugitive slaves Frémonts proclamation 688
584
Proclamation deferred 590
592
Thirteenth Amendment adopted
600
CHAPTER XIX
603
Funding Acts
613
Effects of the War 622
624
Southern Republicans Grants election
632
Results of Reconstruction 638
640
CHAPTER XXI
655
Sinking of the Tecumseh Farraguts exploit
656
Harrison elected President
661
New Tariff Bill Labour disturbances
669
Sinking of the Maine
676
Peace protocol Negotiations at Paris
682
Contrast between North and South
688
Railroads and their results
694
Causes of industrial growth
700
Power of railway companies
706
Migration and agricultural expansion
712
Internal trade Organisation of capital
718
CHAPTER XXIII
723
Eighteenth century Jonathan Edwards
729
Legislation and unwritten law
735
The Knickerbocker Magazine Poe
743
American architecture
749
General Bibliography 7536
753
The English Colonies 75765
757
The French in America 76671
768
The Conquest of Canada 7729
772
The Quarrel with Great Britain 7804
780
The Declaration of Independence 7858
786
The War of Independence 7804
788
The Struggle for Commercial Independence 7916
791
The War of 1812 7979
797
Commerce Expansion and Slavery 8007
800
State Rights 80810
808
XIV XV XVI The Civil War 8115
811
The South during the War 8167
816
Political Reconstruction 81822
820
The United States as a WorldPower 8234
823
The American Intellect 8304
830
Chronological Table of Leading Events 83540
835
Index 84158
841
Copyright

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Page 370 - Europe, which was adopted at an early stage of the wars which have so long agitated that quarter of the globe, nevertheless remains the same ; which is, not to interfere in the internal concerns of any of its powers ; to consider the government de facto as the legitimate government for us ; to cultivate friendly relations with it, and to preserve those relations by a frank, firm, and manly policy ; meeting, in all instances, the just claims of every power, submitting to injuries from none.
Page 444 - I do not expect the house to fall, but I do expect it will cease to be divided. It will become all one thing, or all the other. Either the opponents of slavery will arrest the further spread of it, and place it where the public mind shall rest in the belief that it is in the course of ultimate extinction; or its advocates will push it forward till it shall become alike lawful in all the States, old as well as new, North as well as South.
Page 439 - THE CONSTITUTION OF THE COUNTRY, THE UNION OF THE STATES, AND THE ENFORCEMENT OF THE LAWS...
Page 602 - Fondly do we hope — fervently do we pray — that this mighty scourge of war may speedily pass away. Yet, if God wills that it continue until all the wealth piled by the bondman's two hundred and fifty years of unrequited toil shall be sunk, and until every drop of blood drawn with the lash shall be paid by another drawn with the sword, as was said three thousand years ago, so still it must be said, "The judgments of the Lord are true and righteous altogether.
Page 370 - In the discussions to which this interest has given rise and in the arrangements by which they may terminate the occasion has been judged proper for asserting, as a principle in which the rights and interests of the United States are involved, that the American continents, by the free and independent condition which they have assumed and maintain, are henceforth not to be considered as subjects for future colonization by any European powers.
Page 207 - O ! ye that love mankind ! Ye that dare oppose not only the tyranny but the tyrant, stand forth ! Every spot of the old world is overrun with oppression. Freedom hath been hunted round the Globe. Asia and Africa have long expelled her. Europe regards her like a stranger, and England hath given her warning to depart. O ! receive the fugitive, and prepare in time an asylum for mankind.
Page 602 - Neither party expected for the war the magnitude or the duration which it has already attained. Neither anticipated that the cause of the conflict might cease with or even before the conflict itself should cease. Each looked for an easier triumph, and a result less fundamental and astounding.
Page 474 - And once more let me tell you it is indispensable to you that you strike a blow. I am powerless to help this. You will do me the justice to remember I always insisted that going down the bay in search of a field, instead of fighting at or near Manassas, was only shifting, and not surmounting, a difficulty; that we would find the same enemy and the same or equal intrenchments at either place. The country will not fail to note, is now noting, that the present hesitation to move upon an intrenched enemy...
Page 277 - Resolved, that each branch ought to possess the right of originating acts; that the national legislature ought to be empowered to enjoy the legislative rights vested in Congress by the Confederation, and moreover to legislate in all cases to which the separate states are incompetent or in which the harmony of the United States may be interrupted by the exercise of individual legislation...
Page 410 - ... in case of a deliberate, palpable, and dangerous exercise of other powers, not granted by the said compact, the states, who are parties thereto, have the right, and are in duty bound, to interpose, for arresting the progress of the evil, and for maintaining within their respective limits, the authorities, rights, and liberties appertaining to them.

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