Black Skin, White Masks

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Grove Press, 2008 - Psychology - 206 pages
20 Reviews
Few modern voices have had as profound an impact on the black identity and critical race theory as Frantz Fanon, and Black Skin, White Masks †represents some of his most important work. Fanonís masterwork is now available in a new translation that updates its language for a new generation of readers.
A major influence on civil rights, anti-colonial, and black consciousness movements around the world, Black Skin, White Masks is the unsurpassed study of the black psyche in a white world. Hailed for its scientific analysis and poetic grace when it was first published in 1952, the book remains a vital force today from one of the most important theorists of revolutionary struggle, colonialism, and racial difference in history.
  

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Review: Black Skin, White Masks

User Review  - Bianca - Goodreads

Note: I took a break for like two months with 60 pages left in the book, so this review isn't the freshest. That being said I found Chapters 1-5 much more engaging than the latter chapters. Fanon ... Read full review

Review: Black Skin, White Masks

User Review  - Andrew - Goodreads

It is amazing that Black Skin, White Masks was published in the 1950s yet a lot what Fanon wrote about is still relevant today! I thought the writing was a bit academic. For people who aren't used to ... Read full review

Contents

THE BLACK MAN AND LANGUAGE
1
THE WOMAN OF COLOR AND THE WHITE MAN
24
THE MAN OF COLOR AND THE WHITE WOMAN
45
THE SOCALLED DEPENDENCY COMPLEX OF THE COLONIZED
64
THE LIVED EXPERIENCE OF THE BLACK MAN
89
THE BLACK MAN AND PSYCHOPATHOLOGY
120
THE BLACK MAN AND RECOGNITION
185
B The Black Man and Hegel
191
BY WAY OF CONCLUSION
198
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About the author (2008)

Frantz Fanon (1925-1961) was born in Martinique and studied medicine in France, specializing in psychiatry. Sent to a hospital in Algeria, he found his sympathies turning toward the Algerian Nationalist movement, which he later joined. He is considered one of the most important theorists of the African struggle for independence.

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