The New England Magazine, Volume 11 (Google eBook)

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New England Magazine Company, 1895 - New England
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Page 152 - midst falling dew, While glow the heavens with the last steps of day, Far, through their rosy depths, dost thou pursue Thy solitary way...
Page 256 - And the multitude of them that believed were of one heart and of one soul : neither said any of them that aught of the things which he possessed was his own } but they had all things common.
Page 151 - TO him who in the love of nature holds Communion with her visible forms, she speaks A various language; for his gayer hours She has a voice of gladness, and a smile And eloquence of beauty, and she glides Into his darker musings, with a mild And healing sympathy, that steals away Their sharpness, ere he is aware.
Page 647 - Lonely and spectral and sombre and still. And lo! as he looks, on the belfry's height A glimmer, and then a gleam of light!
Page 152 - And soon that toil shall end ; Soon shalt thou find a summer home, and rest And scream among thy fellows ; reeds shall bend Soon o'er thy sheltered nest. Thou'rt gone, the abyss of heaven Hath swallowed up thy form ; yet on my heart Deeply hath sunk the lesson thou hast given, And shall not soon depart. He who from zone to zone Guides through the boundless sky thy certain flight, In the long way that I must tread alone, Will lead my Steps aright.
Page 329 - Entreat me not to leave thee, or to return from following after thee : for whither thou goest, I will go ; and where thou lodgest I will lodge : thy people shall be my people, and thy God my God: " Where thou diest, will I die, and there will I be buried; the Lord do so to me, and more also, if aught but death part thee and me.
Page 536 - A bishop then must be blameless, the husband of one wife, vigilant, sober, of good behaviour, given to hospitality, apt to teach...
Page 150 - Enough of all its sorrows, crimes, and cares, To tire thee of it, enter this wild wood And view the haunts of Nature. The calm shade Shall bring a kindred calm, and the sweet breeze That makes the green leaves dance, shall waft a balm To thy sick heart.
Page 542 - For they bind heavy burdens, and grievous to be borne, and lay them on men's shoulders ; but they tlicmsehes will not move them with one of their fingers.
Page 148 - The moment was important in my poetical history ; for I date from it my consciousness of the infinite variety of natural appearances which had been unnoticed by the poets of any age or country, so far as I was acquainted with them ; and I made a resolution to supply, in some degree, the deficiency.

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