Life and Public Services of Grover Cleveland: Twenty-second President of the United States and Democratic Nominee for Re-election in 1892. With a Sketch of the Life and Public Services of Adlai E. Stevenson, Nominee for the Vice-presidency (Google eBook)

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Edgewood Publishing Company, 1892 - Campaign biography - 536 pages
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Page 518 - With malice toward none, with charity for all, with firmness in the right, as God gives us to see the right, let us strive on to finish the work we are in ; to bind up the nation's wounds ;. to care for him who shall have borne the battle, and for his widow, and his orphan ; to do all which may achieve and cherish a just and a lasting peace among ourselves and with all nations.
Page 517 - In giving freedom to the slave we assure freedom to the free honorable alike in what we give and what we preserve. We shall nobly save or meanly lose the last best hope of earth.
Page 220 - I have lived, sir, a long time ; and the longer I live the more convincing proofs I see of this truth, That God governs in the affairs of men ! And if a sparrow cannot fall to the ground without his notice, is it probable that an empire can rise without his aid? We have been assured, sir, in the Sacred Writings, that 'except the Lord build the house, they labor in vain that build it.
Page 445 - ... value your own sacred honor, as you respect the rights of humanity, and as you regard the military and national character of America, to express your utmost horror and detestation of the man, who wishes, under any specious pretences, to overturn the liberties of our country, and who wickedly attempts to open the flood-gates of civil discord, and deluge our rising empire in blood.
Page 386 - ... a cordial, habitual, and immovable attachment to it; accustoming yourselves to think and speak of it as of the palladium of your political safety and prosperity; watching for its preservation with jealous anxiety; discountenancing whatever may suggest even a suspicion that it can in any event be abandoned, and indignantly frowning upon the first dawning of every attempt to alienate any portion of our country from the rest or to enfeeble the sacred ties which now link together the various parts.
Page 393 - These principles form the bright constellation which has gone before us, and guided our steps through the age of revolution and reformation. The wisdom of our sages, and blood of our heroes have been devoted to their attainment. They should be the creed of our political faith, the text of civic instruction, the touchstone by which to try the services of those we trust ; and should we wander from them in moments of error or alarm, let us hasten to retrace our steps and to regain the road which alone...
Page 245 - I do not believe that the power and duty of the general government ought to be extended to the relief of individual suffering which is in no manner properly related to the public service or benefit.
Page 389 - As avenues to foreign influence, in innumerable ways, such attachments are particularly alarming to the truly enlightened and independent patriot. How many opportunities do they afford to tamper with domestic factions, to practice the arts of seduction, to mislead public opinion, to influence or awe the public councils!
Page 393 - ... the diffusion of information, and arraignment of all abuses at the bar of the public reason : freedom of religion; freedom of the press; and freedom of person, under the protection of the habeas corpus : and trial by juries impartially selected. These principles form the bright constellation, which has gone before us, and guided our steps through an age of revolution and reformation.
Page 392 - ... a well-disciplined militia, our best reliance in peace, and for the first moments of war, till regulars may relieve them...

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