A Treatise on Concrete, Plain and Reinforced: Materials, Construction, and Design of Concrete and Reinforced Concrete (Google eBook)

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J. Wiley & sons, 1905 - Concrete - 585 pages
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Contents

Specifications for FirstClass Steel for Reinforced Concrete
38
The Selection of the Brand
45
CHAPTER VI
54
Effect of Composition on Quality
62
8 Sampling Iron
64
9 Le Chateliers Specific Gravity Apparatus
66
10 Delicate Laboratory Scales
68
11 Vicat Needle
69
12 Details for Standard Briquette
72
13 Details for Gang Mold
73
14 Pointing Trowel
74
15 Moist Closet
75
16 Immersion Tanks
76
17 Form of Clip
77
18 Steaming Apparatus
78
Elementary Directions for Testing Soundness
79
Separating Material passing No 200 Mesh Sieve
85
19 Time of Setting of Typical Cements and Comparison of Vicat and Gillmore Needles
89
20 Rate of Setting and Corresponding Tensile Strength of Portland Ce ment Paste
91
Form of Briquette for Tensile Tests
92
22 Shot Testing Machine
94
23 Shot Testing Machine
95
24 Compound Lever Testing Machine
96
25 Spring Balance Testing Machine
97
26 Ring Testing Machine ready for Test
98
28 Growth in Tensile Strength of Portland Cement Paste and Mortars
99
29 Growth in Tensile Strength of Natural Cement Paste and Mortars
100
Soundness or Constancy of Volume
101
30 Normal Sound Pat
104
35 Cracked Glass Pat removed
105
38 Specimens showing Effect of Age of Cement upon its Soundness
108
Examples of Unsoundness Developed in Boiling Test
109
CHAPTER VIII
113
40 Funnel used in Weighing Cement
115
41 Compression Testing Machine
117
42 Hydraulic Compression Testing Machine
118
43 Gang Mold for Compression Cubes
119
Transverse Tests of Cement
120
44 Mold for Prism
121
45 Mold for Adhesion Block
122
46 Shearing Test
125
Permeability or Percolation Tests
128
48 Rise in Temperature in 12inch Cubes of Cement and Mortar
130
Strength of Similar Mortars subjected to different Tests
134
49 Derivation of Ferets Formula for Strength
140
Granulometric Composition of Sand Ferets ThreeScreen Method of Analyzing
141
50 Ferets ThreeScreen Method of Analyzing Sand
143
51 Absolute Volumes of Loose Sand
144
53 Absolute Volumes in Fresh Mortar
145
Practical Applications of the Laws of Density
148
57 Conversion of Mechanical Analysis to Granulometric Composition
150
Effect of Natural Impurities in Sand upon Strength of Mortar
154
CHAPTER X
160
Voids and Density of Mixtures of different sized Materials
168
58 Spheres of Equal Size
169
59 Large Stones with Voids filled with Sand
172
61 Graded Mixture of Stones of Various Size and Sand
173
Photographs of Sand
175
66 Voids in Sand containing Varying Percentages of Moisture
177
67 Water required to Gage Ground Quartz Sand
179
73 Diagram Illustrating Method of Combining Curves which do not Over lap
196
74 Diagram Illustrating Method of Combining Curves which Overlap
202
75 Method of Proportioning Two Aggregates
205
76 Method of Proportioning a Graded Mixture
207
Volumetric Synthesis or Proportioning by Trial Mixtures
209
CHAPTER XII
216
Tables and Curves of Quantities of Materials and Volumes
225
With the same Aggregate the strength and watertightness of a con
227
77 Barrels of Portland Cement for one Cubic Yard of Concrete in Various Proportions
228
CHAPTER XIII
236
78 Comparison of AuthorsFormula with Tests of E Candlot
239
79 Comparison of Authors Formula with Tests of George A Kimball
240
Weight of Concrete of Different Proportions
244
So Twelveinch Concrete Cube after Crushing
246
8t Tests on 12inch Concrete Cubes
248
Strength of Short Prisms
251
Transverse Strength of Concrete
260
The Fatigue of Cement
269
Strength and Elasticity of Cinder Concrete
277
General Principles of Reinforced Beams
283
Location of Neutral Axis
291
Formulas for Moment of Resistance in Reinforced Beams
293
Comparison of Straight Line and Parabola Theories
300
General Table for High Carbon Steel
308
Tables of Strength and Reinforcement of Slabs
316
Steel in Compression Portion of Beam
319
Experiments upon Reinforced Beams
326
CHAPTER XV
333
CHAPTER XVI
345
Concrete Plants
361
CHAPTER XVII
368
Bonding Old and New Concrete
376
With the same Percentage of Cement the strength and the water
379
Forms for Mass Concrete
384
Depositing Concrete under Water
392
External Phenomena
400
Mechanical Processes of Disintegration
406
EFFECT OF FREEZING
409
Methods of Construction in Freezing Weather
413
Special Treatment of Surface
419
Results of Experiments on Permeability
425
Fire Protection
431
Tools
439
4
446
Safe Floor Loads
452
Concrete Stairs
459
Concrete Columns
465
Concrete Building Blocks
471
Concrete Piles
477
Fine Sand always produces mortars of lower strength than coarse
482
Bridge Piers
483
Earth Pressure
491
Core Walls
498
Tunnels Design and Construction
509
Open Reservoirs
518
CHAPTER XXVIII
525
Natural Cement Manufacture
541
APPENDIX I
557
Beam no Tension in Concrete Steel in Bottom of Beam Concrete bearing Ten
567
Copyright

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Page 29 - All tests shall be made in accordance with the methods proposed by the Committee on Uniform Tests of Cement of the American Society of Civil Engineers, presented to the Society January 21, 1903, and amended January 20, 1904, with all subsequent amendments thereto.
Page 73 - The sand and cement should be thoroughly mixed dry. The mixing should be done on some non-absorbing surface, preferably plate glass. If the mixing must be done on an absorbing surface it should be thoroughly dampened prior to use.
Page 32 - These pats are observed at intervals for at least 28 days, and, to satisfactorily pass the tests, should remain firm and hard and show no signs of distortion, checking, cracking or disintegrating.
Page 69 - ... cm. (0.39 in.) in diameter, the cap, rod and cylinder weighing 300 gr. (10.58 oz.). The rod, which can be held in any desired position by a screw (F) carries an indicator, which moves over a scale (graduated to centimeters) attached to the frame (K). The paste is held by a conical, hard-rubber ring (I), 7 cm.
Page 30 - F. as practicable, and observed at intervals for at least 28 days. (c) A third pat is exposed in any convenient way in an atmosphere of steam, above boiling water, in a loosely closed vessel for five hours. These pats, to satisfactorily pass the requirements, shall remain firm and hard and show no signs of distortion, checking, cracking, or disintegrating.
Page 77 - Fahr.) and upward. The test pieces should be allowed to remain 24 hours in moist air before immersion in water or steam, or preservation in air.
Page 554 - Recent investigations have shown that large errors in results are often due to the use of impure distilled water and reagents. The analyst should, therefore, test his distilled water by evaporation and his reagents by appropriate tests before proceeding with his work.
Page 70 - The paste is of normal consistency when the cylinder penetrates to a point in the mass 10 mm. (0.39 in.) below the top of the ring. Great care must be taken to fill the ring exactly to the top.
Page 40 - Finished bars shall be free from injurious seams, flaws or cracks, and have a workmanlike finish.
Page 30 - FINENESS. It shall leave by weight a residue of not more than 8 per cent on the No. 100, and not more than 25 per cent on the No. 200 sieve.

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