The Uses of Script and Print, 1300-1700

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Julia C. Crick, Alexandra Walsham
Cambridge University Press, 2004 - History - 298 pages
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This 2003 volume builds upon the widening interest in the connections between culture and communication in medieval and early modern Europe. Focusing on England, it takes a critical look at the scholarly paradigm of the shift from script to print, exploring the possibilities and limitations of these media as vehicles of information and meaning. The essays examine how pen and the press were used in the spheres of religion, law, scholarship, and politics. They assess scribal activity both before and after the advent of printing, illuminating its role in recording and transmitting polemical, literary, antiquarian and utilitarian texts. They also investigate script and print in relation to the spoken word, emphasising the constant interaction and symbiosis of these three media. In sum, this collection helped to refine the boundaries between cultures of speech, manuscript and print, and to reconsider the historical fissures which they have come to represent.
  

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Contents

the case of Julian of Norwich
29
the Benedictines
71
legal authority and judicial accessibility in
95
transcription and English
116
of the Bible in seventeenthcentury England
135
The functions of script in the speech community of a late
157
the uses of script print
191
script print
211
the scribal culture of
235
Thomas Edwards
255
Epilogue
275
Index
290
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Walsham is Lecturer in History at the University of Exeter.