Our recent actors: being recollections critical, and, in many instances, personal, of late distinguished performers of both sexes. With some incidental notices of living actors, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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S. Low, Marston, Searle & Rivington, 1888 - Actors
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Page 115 - As if increase of appetite had grown By what it fed on; and yet, within a month, Let me not think on't: Frailty, thy name is woman! A little month, or ere those shoes were old With which she follow'd my poor father's body, Like Niobe, all tears; why she, even she, O God ! a beast, that wants discourse of reason...
Page 70 - tis fittest. Cor. How does my royal lord? How fares your majesty? Lear. You do me wrong, to take me out o' the grave : Thou art a soul in bliss ; but I am bound Upon a wheel of fire, that mine own tears Do scald like molten lead.
Page 15 - She had the same lone thoughts and wanderings, The quest of hidden knowledge, and a mind To comprehend the universe ; nor these Alone, but with them gentler powers than mine Pity, and smiles, and tears which I had not ; And tenderness but that I had for her : Humility and that I never had. Her faults were mine her virtues were her own : I loved her and destroyed her ! Witch. With thy hand ? Man.
Page 15 - She was like me in lineaments her eyes, Her hair, her features, all, to the very tone Even of her voice, they said were like to mine...
Page 124 - tis not so deep as a well, nor so wide as a church door ; but 'tis enough, 'twill serve : ask for me to-morrow, and you shall find me a grave man. I am peppered, I warrant, for this world. A plague o...
Page 77 - But, as a lesson of common humanity, it was heartrending. The hesitation, the bewildered look, the coming to himself when he sees his hands bloody; the manner in which his voice clung to his throat, and choked his utterance, his agony and tears, the force of nature overcome by passion beggared description.
Page 122 - O, then, I see, queen Mab hath been with you. She is the fairies' midwife ; and she comes In shape no bigger than an agate-stone On the fore-finger of an alderman, Drawn with a team of little atomies Athwart men's noses as they lie asleep : Her waggon-spokes made of long spinners...
Page 71 - Methinks I should know you, and know this man; Yet I am doubtful; for I am mainly ignorant What place this is; and all the skill I have Remembers not these garments; nor I know not Where I did lodge last night. Do not laugh at me; For (as I am a man) I think this lady To be my child Cordelia.
Page 172 - Why, what should be the fear ? I do not set my life at a pin's fee ; And for my soul, what can it do to that, Being a thing immortal as itself ? It waves me forth again : I'll follow it.
Page 78 - But let the frame of things disjoint, both the worlds suffer, Ere we will eat our meal in fear, and sleep In the affliction of these terrible dreams, That shake us nightly...

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