Irving's 1000 Receipts, Or, Modern & Domestic Cookery: A, a [sic] Complete Direction for Carving, Pastry, Cooking, Preserving, Pickling, Making Wines, Jellies, &c., &c. ... with a Complete Table of Cookery for Invalids : Also Observations for the Use of the Mistress of the Family (Google eBook)

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Cornish, Lamport & Company, 1852 - Cookery for the sick - 216 pages
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Page 160 - Seville orange, and then beat it in a mortar till it is very fine. Put to it a spoonful of the best brandy, the juice of a Seville orange, four ounces of loaf sugar, and the yolks of four eggs. Beat them all well together for ten minutes, and then pour in by degrees a pint of boiling cream.
Page 107 - Slice two sweetbreads, and season them in the same manner. Lay a puff paste on the ledge of the dish ; then put the meat, yolks of hard eggs, the sweetbreads, and some oysters, up to the top of the dish. Lay over the whole some very thin slices of ham, and fill...
Page 163 - Orange Jelly. Grate the rind of two Seville and two China oranges, and two lemons; squeeze the juice of three of each, and strain, and add the juice of a quarter of a pound of lump sugar, and a quarter of a pint of water, and boil till it almost candies.
Page 77 - Game ought not to be thrown away even when it has been kept a very long time ; for when it seems to be spoiled, it may often be made fit for eating, by nicely cleaning it, and washing with vinegar and water. If there is danger of birds not keeping, draw, crop, and pick them ; then wash in two or three 7* waters, and rub them wilh sa-lt.
Page 162 - Run the jelly through and through until clear ; then put it into glasses or forms. The following mode will greatly facilitate the clearing of jelly : When the mixture has boiled twenty minutes, throw in a tea-cupful of cold water ; let it boil five minutes longer ; then take the saucepan off the fire, covered close, and keep it half an hour; after which, it will be so clear as to need only once running through the bag, and much waste will be saved.
Page 206 - Pork Jelly. Take a leg of well-fed pork, just as cut up, beat it, and break the bone. Set it over a gentle fire, with three gallons of water, and simmer to one. Let half an ounce of mace, and the same of nutmegs, stew in it. Strain through a fine sieve. When cold, take off the fat. Give a chocolate-cup the first and last thing, and at noon, putting salt to taste.
Page 46 - Chop equal quantities of lean and fat bacon, a handful of sage, a little salt and pepper, and a few anchovies. Beat all in a mortar ; and when used roll and fry it, and serve it with fried sippets, or on stewed vegetables, or on white collops. Scotch Collops. Cut veal into thin bits about three inches over, and...
Page 117 - Oatmeal Pudding. Pour a quart of boiling milk over a pint of the best fine oatmeal ; let it soak all night ; next day beat two eggs, and mix a little salt ; butter a basin that will just hold it : cover it tight with a floured cloth, and boil it an hour and a half. Eat it with cold butter and salt. When cold, slice and toast it, and eat it its oatcake buttered.
Page 109 - ... keep the fat and lean separate. Put it in layers, quite close up to the top ; lay on the lid , cut the edge smooth round, and pinch it ; bake in a slow soaking oven, as the meat is very solid. Directions for raising the crust will be given hereafter.
Page 43 - ... shred, two grates of nutmeg, some salt, and four or five spoonfuls of either a little weak broth, milk, or water; simmer these gently with the meat, but take care not to let it boil ; and add a bit of butter rubbed in flour. Put sippets of thin toasted bread, cut into a three-cornered shape, round the dish.

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