The economy of nature explained and illustrated on the principles of modern philosophy, Volume 3 (Google eBook)

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J. Johnson, 1796 - Philosophy - 46 pages
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Page 477 - When we set before our eyes a round globe of any uniform colour, vg gold, alabaster, or jet, it is certain that the idea thereby imprinted in our mind is of a flat circle variously shadowed, with several degrees of light and brightness coming to our eyes. But we having by use been accustomed to perceive...
Page 554 - The true genius is a mind of large general powers, accidentally determined to some particular direction.
Page 554 - Fairy Queen ; in which he very early took delight to read, till, by feeling the charms of verse, he became, as he relates, irrecoverably a poet. Such are the accidents, which, sometimes remembered, and perhaps sometimes forgotten, produce that particular designation of mind, and propensity for some certain science or employment, which is commonly called Genius.
Page 77 - After giving the details of his analysis of sugar and of the products of fermentation Lavoisier continues : — " The effect of the vinous fermentation upon sugar is thus reduced to the mere separation of its elements into two portions ; one part is oxygenated at the expense of the other, so as to form carbonic acid ; while the other part, being disoxygenated in favour of the latter, is converted into the combustible substance called alkohol ; therefore, if it were possible to re-unite alkohol and...
Page 561 - This power which the mind has thus to order the consideration of any idea, or the forbearing to consider it; or to prefer the motion of any part of the body to its rest, and vice versa, in any particular instance; is that which we call the will. The actual exercise of that power, by directing any particular action, or its forbearance, is that which we call volition or willing.
Page 561 - I think evident, that we find in ourselves a power to begin or forbear, continue or end, several actions of our minds and motions of our bodies, barely by a thought or preference of the mind ordering, or, as it were, commanding the doing or not doing such or such a particular action.
Page 434 - ... one particular portion of it to act at a time. * The next thing to be remarked is the figure of the pupil, which is different in different animals, but always exactly accommodated to the creature's way of life, as well as to the different fpecies of objects that are viewed.
Page 190 - The foletis, or gaftrocnemius internus, allb arifes by two heads; one from the upper and back part of the head of the fibula, the other from the upper and pofterior part of the tibia..
Page 545 - A young man, of the town of Chartres, between the age of twenty-three and twenty-four, the son of a tradesman, and deaf and dumb from his birth, began to speak all of a sudden to the great astonishment of the whole town.
Page 489 - When ideas, and trains of ideas, occur, or are called up, in a vivid manner, and without regard to the order of former actual impressions and perceptions, this is said to be done by the power of imagination or fancy.

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