The Transformations of Lucius: Otherwise Known as The Golden Ass

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Macmillan, 1951 - Fiction - 293 pages
1 Review
The Golden Ass by Apuleius is a unique, entertaining, and thoroughly readable Latin novel - the only work of fiction in Latin to have survived in entirety from antiquity. It tells the story of the hero Lucius, whose curiosity and fascination for sex and magic results in his transformation into an ass. After suffering a series of trials and humiliations, he is ultimately transformed back into human shape by the kindness of the Goddess Isis. Simultaneously a blend of romantic adventure, fable, and religious testament, the Golden Ass is one of the truly seminal books of European Literature, of intrinsic interest as a novel in its own right, and one of the earliest examples of the picaresque. It includes as its famous centrepiece the myth of Cupid and Psyche, the search of the human soul for union with the divine, and has been the inspiration for numerous creative works of literature and art since the Renaissance. This new translation is at once faithful to the meaning of the Latin, whilst reproducing all the exuberant gaiety of the original.
  

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Review: The Golden Ass: The Transformations of Lucius

User Review  - Michael Murray - Goodreads

read this quite some years ago now in my R Graves phase - like most of his I read then, I doubt any of it will now stand up by itself, without his rather preposterous White Goddess excuse for doing what the hell he wants with whomever he wants. Some called the ending mawkish - I suppose it is. Read full review

Contents

The Story of Aristomenes
3
At Milos House
19
The Story of Thelyphron
39
The Festival of Laughter
52
Lucius Is Transformed
68
The Bandits Cave
80
Cupid and Psyche I
96
Cupid and Psyche II
107
With the Eunuch Priests
181
At the MillHouse
201
With the MarketGardener and the Centurion
218
At the Councillors House
230
Under the Trainer
241
The Goddess Isis Intervenes
255
The Ass Is Transformed
267
At the Bar
282

Cupid and Psyche III
122
Defeat of the Bandits
144
At the StudFarm
162
Appendix
289
Copyright

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About the author (1951)

Robert Graves (also known as Robert Ranke Graves) was born in 1895 in London and served in World War I. Goodbye to All That: an Autobiography (1929), was published at age thirty three, and gave a gritty portrait of his experiences in the trenches. Graves edited out much of the stark reality of the book when he revised it in 1957. Although his most popular works, I, Claudius (1934) and its sequel, Claudius the God and His Wife Messalina (1935), were produced for television by the BBC in 1976 and seen in America on Masterpiece Theater, he was also famous as a poet, producing more than 50 volumes of poetry. Graves was awarded the 1934 James Tait Black Memorial Prize for both I, Claudius and Claudius the God. Also a distinguished academic, Graves was a professor of English in Cairo, Egypt, in 1926, a poetry professor at Oxford in the 1960s, and a visiting lecturer at universities in England and the U.S. He wrote translations of Greek and Latin works, literary criticism, and nonfiction works on many other topics, including mythology and poetry. He lived most of his life in Majorca, Spain, and died after a protracted illness in 1985.

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