Lays of ancient Rome (Google eBook)

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Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans, 1849 - English poetry - 210 pages
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Review: Lays of Ancient Rome

User Review  - Steven Walle - Goodreads

This is a group of 4 poems about certain battles of war. These poems were required reading and required memorization for Italian and English children. Very awesome imagery is depicted throughout this volume. Enjoy! Read full review

Review: Lays of Ancient Rome

User Review  - J. Gowin - Goodreads

As a collection of poetry its greatness is best shown by its wonderfull quotability. Read full review

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Page 73 - No sound of joy or sorrow Was heard from either bank; But friends and foes, in dumb surprise, With parted lips and straining eyes, Stood gazing where he sank; And when above the surges They saw his crest appear. All Rome sent forth a rapturous cry, And even the ranks of Tuscany Could scarce forbear to cheer.
Page 66 - Then, whirling up his broadsword With both hands to the height, He rushed against Horatius, And smote with all his might. With shield and blade Horatius Right deftly turned the blow: The blow, though turned, came yet too nigh; It missed his helm, but gashed his thigh : The Tuscans raised a joyful cry To see the red blood flow.
Page 59 - Then none was for a party ; Then all were for the state ; Then the great man helped the poor, And the poor man loved the great : Then lands were fairly portioned ; Then spoils were fairly sold : The Romans were like brothers In the brave days of old.
Page 57 - Hew down the bridge, Sir Consul, With all the speed ye may; I, with two more to help me, Will hold the foe in play. In yon strait path a thousand May well be stopped by three. Now who will stand on either hand, And keep the bridge with me?" Then out spake Spurius Lartius; A Ramnian proud was he: "Lo, I will stand at thy right hand, And keep the bridge with thee.
Page 46 - The harvests of Arretium This year old men shall reap, This year young boys in Umbro Shall plunge the struggling sheep, And in the vats of Luna This year the must shall foam Round the white feet of laughing girls Whose sires have marched to Rome.
Page 44 - East and west and south and north The messengers ride fast, And tower and town and cottage Have heard the trumpet's blast. Shame on the false Etruscan Who lingers in his home, When Porsena of Clusium Is on the march for Rome.
Page 71 - And like a horse unbroken When first he feels the rein, The furious river struggled hard, And tossed his tawny mane, And burst the curb, and bounded, Rejoicing to be free ; And whirling down, in fierce career Battlement, and plank, and pier, Rushed headlong to the sea. LVI I. Alone stood brave Horatius, But constant still in mind ; Thrice thirty thousand foes before, And the broad flood behind. "Down with him ! " cried false Sextus, With a smile on his pale face. " Now yield thee," cried Lars Porsena,...
Page 62 - The Three stood calm and silent. And looked upon the foes. And a great shout of laughter From all the vanguard rose : And forth three chiefs came spurring Before that deep array; To earth they sprang, their swords they drew, And lifted high their shields, and flew To win the narrow way...
Page 65 - But hark! the cry is Astur: And lo! the ranks divide; And the great Lord of Luna Comes with his stately stride. Upon his ample shoulders Clangs loud the four-fold shield, And in his hand he shakes the brand Which none but he can wield.
Page 56 - Then out spake brave Horatius, The Captain of the gate : 'To every man upon this earth Death cometh soon or late; And how can man die better Than facing fearful odds, For the ashes of his fathers And the temples of his Gods...

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