INSTITUTES OF METAPHYSIC (Google eBook)

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Contents

No good can be expected so long as philosophy to not reasoned ib 16 The masks of philosophy a 17 Its unsatisfactory state further accounted for Th...
10
Explanation continued First principles always come out last
12
Illustrations of this from language and grammar ib 20 Illustration continued
13
Illustration from logic
14
A reason why the truth of this doctrine is not obvious 184
16
Ambiguities of the old philosophers
17
Illustration from law
22
Application to philosophy Hero too flrtt principles come out last
23
These principles though operative in philosophy are unnoticed and
24
A remedial system uniting truth and reason not Impossible
25
Single canon for the right use of reason
26
This system of Institutes claims both truth and demonstration but rather demonstration than truth
27
It is a body of necessary truth Its pretensions stated ib 37 An objection to its method stated and obviated
28
The polemical character of this system
29
This might be abundantly proved by the testimony of philosophers
30
The object or business to do of philosophy renders her essentially polemical
31
This system also adverse to psychologyand why
32
IFViai philosophy has to do again distinctly stated
33
Its positive object still more distinctly stated Definition of metaphysics
34
Why philosophy undertakes this object
35
The synthesis of ego and nonego is original and not factitious
36
Further explanations as to hoie philosophy goes to work
37
Advantages of this method
38
Disadvantages of not contrasting distinctly the true and the false
39
General unintelllgibility of systems Is due to their neglect to exhibit this contrast
40
This system contrasts distinctly the true and the false
42
The section called ontology naturally comes finlbut is truly lost In order
43
It must be made to revolve away from us in order to bring round the ephtemology which though it naturally comes last is truly first in order
45
EpUtmology and ontolony the two main divisions of philosophy
46
The epistemology does of itself afford no entrance to ontology Why not?
47
Because Absolute Existence may be that which we are Ignorant
58
This consideration necessitates a new section of philosophy called the agnoiology Its business
59
Now we can settle the problem of ontologyand how
60
Recapitulation of the three sections 1 Epiateinology 2 Agnoiology 3 Ontology This arrangement not arbitrary but necessary
61
The necessity of keeping these divisions perfectly distinct
62
The natural oversights of thought are rectified in these three sections
64
secondary 4
67
PROPOSITION I
75
PROPOSITION II
93
PROPOSITION III
101
known
129
PROPOSITION V
140
PROPOSITION VI
152
Demonstbation
153
In what sense the contingent element is necessary and in what sense it Is contingent
156
Question concerning the particular and the universal instead of heing made a question of Knowing
157
Was made a question of Being hy the early philosophers Thales
160
Indecision of Greek speculation The three crises of philosophy
161
Plato appeared during the second crisis His aim
163
Platos deficiencies
164
Ills merits The question respecting the particular and the universal demands an entire reconsideration
165
A preliminary amhiguity
166
Further statement of amhiguity ih 15 Illustrations of the amhiguity
167
Is the Platonic analysis of cognition and existence a division into clc ment or into kind?
168
Rightly interpreted It is a division into elements
170
It has heen generally mistaken for a division Into kinds
171
Explanation of this charge
173
Sixth Counter proposition
175
This counterproposition is Itself a proof of the charge here made against philosophers 17f i
176
Review of our position
177
Misinterpretation of the Platonic analysis traced into its consequences J 78
179
Realism is superseded hy Conceptualism ISO 27 Conceptualism is destroyed hy Nominalism
181
Evasion hy which conceptualism endeavours to recover her ground and to conciliate nominalism Its failure
182
Nomiualism
185
Nominalism is annihilated hy Proposition VI
186
The summing up
187
The ahstract and the concrete
189
PROPOSITION VII
191
Demonstbation ib Obsebvations and Explanations
192
Three misconceptions arising out of these ambiguities
206
Hence philosophy is nowhere a scheme reasoned throughout 17
211
PROPOSITION IX
235
PROPOSITION X
250
Comment on first misconception 217
267
Comment on second misconception
268
Comment on third misconception 2GI
269
Key to the Greek philosophy
271
Return to counterproposition It is founded on a confusion of the dis Unction between sense and intellect
273
PROPOSITION XIII
303
PROPOSITION XIV
314
PROPOSITION XVI
321
32 to 327 PROPOSITION XVII
328
DEmOnSTRAtIon to OBSERVatIOns And EXPLAnatIOns
329
Seventeenth Counterproportion A 2 Conglomerate character of the counterproposition
330
Elimination of its ontologies surplusage to 4 Its contradictory character exposed in so far as it is psychological
332
The counterproposition considered in so far as it is the product of natu ral thinking
333
The exact point in the counter proposition which natural thinking opposes to the proposition
334
Psychological opinion as to existing substance
335
Secondly It places before us the mere phenomenal
336
The Institutional conception of known substance
337
History of distinction between substance and phenomenonits terms have been reversed
338
Errors caused by this reversal
339
Substance and phenomenon originally bore the signification assigned to them here
340
The known phenomenal according to the older systems to 16 The known substantial according to the older systems
341
A word upon existing substance and phenomenon 4b 18 Two main ambiguities in the old systems
342
These ambiguities accounted for
344
And cleared up by a reference to the Institutional doctrine to 21 Coincidence of the old speculations with the Institutes
346
An objection obviated
347
Mistakes of the historians of philosophy as to substance
348
A traditional dogma about disdaining the senses
349
The true meaning of turning the mind away from the senses
350
What the ancient philosophers meant by this dogma
351
Contrast between speculation and psychology in their views of substance and phenomenon
352
Speculation proved to be right even by a reference to experience
354
PROPOSITION XVIII
355
PROPOSITION XIX
359
Demonstbation
365
Continuation of these remarks 53
367
PROPOSITION XXII
376
PROPOSITION I
397
PROPOSITION III
404
PROPOSITION IV
409
PROPOSITION VI
420
PROPOSITION VIII
424
Demonstbation ih OBseRtatIONS ANd EXPlaNatIONS
425
Relation of this proposition to Proposition II of the epistemolopy in 2 The ohject of ignorance is neither nothing nor the contradictory
426
It is helieved that this doctrine Is new
427
What has caused this doctrine to he missed
428
Another circumstance which has caused it to he missed
429
In fixing the ohject of ignorance this proposition does not deny its mag nitude
430
How far the ohject of ignorance is definahle and how far it is not de finahle
431
The advantage of discriminating the necessary from the contingent laws of knowledge
432
This system is more humhle in its pretensions than other systems
434
Eighth Counterproposition
435
The grounds on which it rests are false 46
436
The suhstantial and ahsolute in Ignorance
437
The main result of the agnoiology shortly stated
438
Concluding remark 459
439
SECTION III
441
PROPOSITION I
443
The Thbee Altebnatives as to Absoluts Existence Demonstbation Obsebvations and Explanations 1 The prohlem of ontology stated 2 Its three alternat...
444
i ih 444 16 ib 445 16
445
ib ib
447
Distinction hetween the singly and the douhly contradictory 441
450
PROPOSITION III
454
What Absolute Existence is 51X1
455
PROPOSITION VI
462
PROPOSITION VII
465
PROPOSITION IX
469
Demonstbation ib Obsebvations and Explanations
501
What is Truth?
502
All Existence is the synthesis of the universal and the particular
503
Thus the equation of the Known and the Existent has been proved 004
505
Attention called to restriction in foregoing paragraph ib 7 Illustration of restrictionWhat the ontology gives out as alone Abeo lute Existence
506
This paragraph qualities an assertion made in p 270
507
In what sense we know and in what sense we are ignorant of Absolute Existence 608
510
Demonstbation ib osbcbvations and Explanations
511
Distinction taken in this proposition Ontological proof of Deity ib 2 The system is forced to this conclusion
512
Eleventh Counterproposilion
513
Summaby and Conclusion
514
The main question ishow has the system redeemed Its pledges? a 2 It is submitted that the system is both reasoned and true
515
The chief consideration to be looked to in estimating the system 4 Its negative character Is to be attended to principally 46
516
The second contradiction which it corrects
518
The fourth and fifth contradictions which it corrects
519
The propositions and counterpropositions fall into group a 12 The sixth contradiction which the epistemology corrects
520
The seventh contradiction which it corrects
521

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Page 237 - For my part, when I enter most intimately into what I call myself, I always stumble on some particular perception or other, of heat or cold, light or shade, love or hatred, pain or pleasure. I never can catch myself at any time without a perception, and never can observe anything but the perception.
Page 539 - PAUL. Analysis and Critical Interpretation of the Hebrew Text of the Book of Genesis. Preceded by a Hebrew Grammar, and Dissertations on the Genuineness of the Pentateuch, and on the Structure of the Hebrew Language.
Page 405 - If the reader has got well in hand these two truths, first, that there can be a knowledge of things only with the addition of a self or subject; and, secondly, that there can be an ignorance only of that of which there can be a knowledge, he will find himself in possession of a lever powerful enough to break open the innermost secrecies of nature.
Page 404 - Therefore, we can be ignorant only of what can possibly be known ; in other words, there can be an ignorance only of that of which there can be a knowledge.
Page 13 - No man saw the seed planted no eye noticed the infant sprouts no mortal hand watered the nursling of the grove no register was kept of the gradual widening of its girth, or of the growing circumference of its shade till, the deciduous dialects of surrounding barbarians dying out, the unexpected bole stands forth in all its magnitude, carrying aloft in its foliage the poetry, the history, and the philosophy of a heroic people, and dropping for ever over the whole civilised world the...
Page 91 - The object of knowledge, whatever it may be, is always something more than what is naturally or usually regarded as the object. It always is, and must be, the object with the addition of oneself, object plus subject, thing, or thought, mecum. Self is an integral and essential part of every object of cognition.
Page 508 - All absolute existences are contingent except "one; in other words, there is One, but only " one, Absolute Existence which is strictly " necessary ; and that existence is a supreme " and infinite and everlasting Mind in synthesis
Page 188 - PARTICULAR IN COGNITION ARE. The ego (or mind) is known as the element common to all cognitions, matter is known as the element peculiar to some cognitions : in other words, we know ourselves as the unchangeable, necessary, and universal part of our cognitions, while we know matter, in all its varieties, as a portion of the changeable, contingent, and particular part...
Page 2 - Of these obligations, the latter is the more stringent : it is more proper that philosophy should be reasoned, than that it should be true ; because while truth may perhaps be attainable by man, to reason is certainly his province, and within his power. In a case where two objects have to be overtaken, it is more incumbent on us to compass the one to which our faculties are certainly competent, than the other, to which they are perhaps inadequate.
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