Sound and Music (Google eBook)

Front Cover
A.C. McClurg, 1892 - Music - 452 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 278 - I have seen A curious child, who dwelt upon a tract Of inland ground, applying to his ear The convolutions of a smooth-lipped shell ; To which, in silence hushed, his very soul Listened intensely ; and his countenance soon Brightened with joy ; for from within were heard Murmurings, whereby the monitor expressed Mysterious union with its native sea.
Page 282 - Orpheus with his lute made trees, And the mountain tops that freeze, Bow themselves, when he did sing: To his music plants and flowers Ever sprung ; as sun and showers There had made a lasting spring.
Page 37 - s music in the sighing of a reed ; There's music in the gushing of a rill ; There's music in all things, if men had ears : Their earth is but an echo of the spheres.
Page 37 - We have not heard the music of the spheres, The song of star to star, but there are sounds More deep than human joy and human tears, That Nature uses in her common rounds ; The fall of streams, the cry of winds that strain The oak, the roaring of the sea's surge, might Of thunder breaking afar off, or rain That falls by minutes in the summer night. These are the voices of earth's secret...
Page 37 - At bottom, it turns still on power of intellect; it is a man's sincerity and depth of vision that makes him a Poet. See deep enough, and you see musically; the heart of Nature being everywhere music, if you can only reach it.
Page 343 - It was long known to musicians that, besides the principal or fundamental note of a string, an experienced ear could detect in its sound other notes related to this fundamental one by fixed laws of harmony, and which are called therefore harmonic sounds. They are the very same, which, by the production of distinct nodes, may be insulated, as it were, and cleared from the confusing effect of the co-existent sounds.
Page 132 - after having overflowed the whole country of Egypt, when it returned within its natural bounds, left on the shore a great number of dead animals of various kinds, and among the rest a tortoise, the flesh of which being dried and wasted by the sun, nothing was left within the shell but nerves and cartilages, and these being braced and contracted by desiccation, were rendered sonorous.
Page 369 - Helmholtz's conclusion, which came into •wide acceptance as a basic principle of sound perception, was that "the quality of the musical portion of a compound tone depends solely on the number and relative strength of its partial simple tones, and in no respect on their differences of phase
Page 132 - after having overflowed the whole country of Egypt, when it returned within its natural bounds, left on the shore a great number of dead animals of various kinds, and, among the rest, a tortoise, the flesh of which being dried and wasted by the sun, nothing was left within the shell, but nerves and cartilages, and these being braced and contracted by...
Page 213 - Zephyr, whisp'ring through the hollow reeds, Taught the first swains the hollow reeds to sound...

Bibliographic information