Ebony Jr!: The Rise, Fall, and Return of a Black Children's Magazine (Google eBook)

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Scarecrow Press, 2008 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 219 pages
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In 1945, John H. Johnson published the first issue of Ebony magazine, a monthly periodical aimed at African American readers. In 1973, the Johnson Publishing Company expanded its readership to include children by producing Ebony Jr!. Targeting Black children in the five to eleven age-range, the magazine featured stories, comics, puzzles, and cartoons. Its contents combined elements of Black culture, Black history, and elementary school curriculum. The publication remained in print until 1985 and was resurrected online in 2007. In Ebony Jr! The Rise, Fall and Return of a Black Children's Magazine, Laretta Henderson charts this unique publication's genesis, history, and impact. She analyzes the structure and literary context of Ebony Jr!, revealing how the political climate informed the composition of the magazine. Henderson also profiles the magazine's publisher, John H. Johnson, and examines how his corporate structure facilitated and informed Ebony Jr!'s content, success, and its initial demise. This culturally significant milestone in African American culture is given its due deference in this interdisciplinary examination of the environment in which Ebony Jr! was produced, assessing what the magazine's existence meant to a generation of young readers.
  

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Contents

Ebony Jr A Profile
3
Ebony Jrs Market
27
Ebony Jrs Publisher John H Johnson
45
CONTEXTS AND ANALYSIS POLITICS AND EDUCATION
67
The Political Socialization of Black Childhood The Case for Ebony Jr
69
Gaining Skills Values and Historically Accurate Knowledge
109
CONTEXTS AND ANALYSIS CONSTRUCTING BLACK CHILDREN AND THEIR LITERATURE
149
Johnson Publishing Companys Construction of the Black Child
151
Conclusion
181
Bibliography
201
Index
211
About the Author
219
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Laretta Henderson is assistant professor in the School of Information Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

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