The Forests of Dickenson County, Virginia (Google eBook)

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J.P. Bell Company, 1917 - Forests and forestry - 17 pages
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Page 16 - The rough character of the land classifies a very large percentage of the "coal-measures" and part of the "limestone" section of the county as permanent forest land. The conditions are favorable for rapid growth of the most valuable species, but unless fires are prevented and unless cutting is done in such a way as to protect and favor the thrifty small trees, the supply of timber will not be sufficient when the coal resources of the county are developed. The present customary diameter limit of 12...
Page 15 - Forest types. The forest may be divided into three types ridge, slope, and cove the occurrence of each being indicated by its name. There are characteristic species composing each.
Page 14 - ... revenue to the people of the county, and will be indispensable when the coal resources are developed ; but that in the absence of fire protection and good management the forests will inevitably deteriorate and become practically nothing but a barren waste. SUMMARY. (1) Location and area. Buchanan County is situated in the extreme southwestern part of the State. Its area is 324,480 acres, or 507 square miles. (2) Topography and drainage. The topography is exceedingly rough and broken....
Page iv - ... poplar. This includes all land having the original forest growth, with the possible exception of the black walnut, most of which was cut 30 years ago; 4,112 acres, or 1.3 per cent of the county, still contains the original forest stand (excepting black walnut). Estimating an average stand of 6,000 board feet per acre, the present stand of timber in this class of forest is approximately 24,672,000 board feet. (2) Virgin without poplar. This includes all the land where only the virgin yellow...
Page 13 - ... three moderate-sized trees per acre should be sufficient. Fires must be kept out. Even with the most careless cutting some sort of tree-growth will come in if fires are kept out, but if periodic fires are to follow logging operations, care in cutting and the leaving of seed trees will be wasted effort. Such fires kill or ruin all young growth, destroy the fertility of the soil, and make the establishment of a new stand of any value very difficult or even impossible for many years. Poplar, northern...
Page 14 - ... this limit would leave practically no thrifty trees below 16 inches in diameter. Openings should never be made larger than half an acre in area. To avoid this an occasional seedtree should be left. There should be left at least two or three seed-trees per acre, well distributed through any openings. These seed-trees should be of the best species poplar, oak, basswood, cucumber, or ash but need not be large, valuable trees. They should be only average-sized trees, with welldeveloped crowns,...
Page 15 - ... classes based on the extent to which it has been cut over, namely: (a) Virgin with poplar, 1.3 per cent of the area of the county; (b) Virgin without poplar, 39.2 per cent of the area of the county; (c) Cut-over, 41.3 per cent of the area of the county. (The remaining 18.2 per cent is cleared land.) (12) Stand of timber. The total stand of merchantable timber in the county is estimated to be 600 million board feet. (13) Methods of lumbering in the past. During the period from about 30...

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