Narrative of a Voyage to the West Indies and Mexico in the Years 1599-1602, Volume 23 (Google eBook)

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Hakluyt Society, 1859 - West Indies - 48 pages
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Page lxx - By surrendering courteously, you may be assured of all kinds of contentment, both for your persons and for your property, which on the faith that I have in Paradise, I will preserve as I would my own, without the least portion in the world being diminished. The Basques whom I send you are men of the vessels that I have captured, and they can tell you the state of affairs between France and England, and even how matters are passing in France, touching the new company of this country. Send me word...
Page xvii - ... see what those engaged in the undertaking should do. I told him that I was very much his servant, but that I could not give myself license to undertake the voyage without the commands of the king, to whom I was bound, as well by birth as by the pension with which His Majesty honoured me to enable me to maintain myself near his person, but that, if it should please him to speak to the king about it, and give me his commands, that it...
Page 42 - One may judge," says Champlain, writing in 1559, "that if the four leagues of land, which there are from Panama to this river, were cut through, one might pass from the south sea to the ocean on the other side, and thus shorten the route by more than fifteen hundred leagues ; and from Panama to the straits of Magellan would be an island, and from Panama to the Newfoundland would be another island, so that the whole of America would be in two islands.
Page 42 - ... which there are from Panama to this river were cut through, one / might pass from the south sea to the ocean on the other side, and thus shorten the route by more than fifteen hundred leagues ;' and from Panama to the Straits of Magellan, would be an island, and from Panama to the New-foundlands would be another island, so that the whole of America would be in two islands/?
Page ci - Brief narrative of the most remarkable things that Samuel Champlain of Brouage observed in the West Indies, during the voyage which he made to the same in the years one Thousand five Hundred and Ninety Nine to one Thousand Six Hundred and Two, as follows.
Page 46 - ... south, continued to bear ill-witness against the Bermudas. Writing in 1595 of his voyage to Guiana, Sir Walter Ralegh speaks of them as a ' hellish sea for thunder, lightning, and storms2'; Champlain, the great pioneer of French colonisation in Canada, who sighted them about 1600, has left a record of ' a mountainous island, which it is difficult to approach on account of the dangers that surround it...
Page 3 - In this island there is a good town, which is called by the same name, La Marguerite. The isle is very fertile in corn and fruits; every day more than three hundred canoes leave the harbour of the said town, which go about a league to sea to fish for pearls, in ten or twelve fathoms water. The said fishing is done by negroes, slaves of the king of Spain, who take a little basket under their arm, and with it plunge to the bottom of the sea, and fill it with ostrormes, which resemble oysters ; then...
Page lxix - Quebec some days after in the custody of six Basques, who delivered to Champlain the following letter: "MESSIEURS: — I give you notice that I have received a commission from the king of Great Britain, my honoured lord and master, to take possession of the countries of Canada and Acadia, and for that purpose eighteen ships have been despatched, each taking the route ordered by His Majesty. I have already seized the habitation of Miscou, and all boats and pinnaces on that coast, as well as those...
Page lxxi - ... there were in a fortress the better it could hold out, still it could be maintained with but little, provided good order were kept; therefore, being still furnished with grain, maize, beans and pease, (besides what the country could supply) which his soldiers loved as well as the finest corn in the world, by surrendering the fort in so good a condition, he would be unworthy to appear before his sovereign, and would deserve chastisement before God and men. He was sure that Kirke would respect...
Page 39 - The system that is now used is, that in every estance (estancia), which are like our villages, there is a priest who regularly instructs them, the said priest having a list of the names and surnames of all the Indians who inhabit the village under his charge. There is also an Indian, who is as the fiscal of the village...

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The Online Books Page: Narrative of a Voyage to the West Indies ...
Title: Narrative of a Voyage to the West Indies and Mexico in the Years 1599-1602 · Author: Champlain, Samuel de, 1567-1635 ...
onlinebooks.library.upenn.edu/ webbin/ book/ lookupid?key=olbp13916

South Seas Companion Details - Book
Title: Narrative of a voyage to the West Indies and Mexico in the years 1599-1602. Imprint: Printed for the Hakluyt Society, London, 1859 ...
southseas.nla.gov.au/ scripts/ sspo-bib.php3?pubid=PSSP02970

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