Liberty Men and Great Proprietors: The Revolutionary Settlement on the Maine Frontier, 1760-1820

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UNC Press Books, Jan 1, 1990 - History - 408 pages
2 Reviews
This detailed exploration of the settlement of Maine beginning in the late eighteenth century illuminates the violent, widespread contests along the American frontier that served to define and complete the American Revolution. Taylor shows how Maine's mil
  

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Review: Liberty Men and Great Proprietors (Institute of Early American History & Culture (Paperback))

User Review  - Howard Mansfield - Goodreads

Taylor's history of the backcountry revolts in Maine is a detailed account of how the settlers “squatting” on the land fought against the moneyed gentlemen whose dubious land grants were honored by ... Read full review

Review: Liberty Men and Great Proprietors (Institute of Early American History & Culture (Paperback))

User Review  - Chris Perham - Goodreads

I really enjoyed this book. His section on the supernatural economy (settlers looking for buried treasure by the light of the moon) presages Powerball Fever. There is a lot of detail and much of interest to genealogists here. Read full review

Contents

Origins of the Conflict
11
Revolution
14
Reaction
18
Law
21
Property
24
The Great Proprietors
31
Charles Vaughan
34
Henry Knox
37
The Evangelical Triumph
139
Religion and the Resistance
142
The Cultural Divide
148
Leading Men
155
Rewards and Threats
160
Perils and Opportunities
168
Daniel Lamberts Treasure Chest
178
White Indians
181

Josiah Little
47
Civilization versus Nature
49
Discipline versus Cunning
51
The Prescription
53
Order versus Anarchy
57
The Settlers
61
Settling
62
Hardships
66
Poverty
71
Hope
73
Agriculture
75
Markets
77
Mutuality
82
Resistance
85
Liberty Men
89
The SeedPlot of Sedition
90
James Shurtleff
101
Samuel Ely
105
The Rulers and the Ruled
109
Defending the Revolution
112
Confrontations
115
Seekers and Preachers
123
The Mystic and His Judge
128
The Orthodox and the Evangelical
131
The White Indian King
185
Horrid Visages
190
Restraint
194
Fear
197
Bloodshed
199
White Men
205
The Jeffersonians
209
The Settlers Friends
215
The Betterment Act
220
Coming to Terms
225
The National Pattern
229
The Aftermath of Resistance
233
Accommodation
236
Postscript
244
MidMaine Towns
251
Tables
254
Incidents of Extralegal Violence Associated with the Land Controversies
264
ESSAY ON SOURCES
281
SECONDARY SOURCES
286
ABBREVIATIONS
291
NOTES
293
INDEX
369
Copyright

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About the author (1990)

Alan Shaw Taylor was born in 1955 in Portland, Maine. He graduated from Colby College in Waterville, Maine in 1977. He went on to earn his PhD. from Brandeis University in 1986. He has become a professor of history at the University of California. He is best known for his contributions to microhistory which he demonstrated in his Pulitzer Prize winning history of William Cooper and the settlement of Cooperstown, New York. In this work, Alan Taylor uses court records, land records, letters and diaries to reconstruct the economic, political and socila history of New England and the settlement of New York. He is also a regular contributor of book reviews and essays to The New Republic. His books include William Cooper's Town: Power & Persuasion on the Frontier of the Early American Republic, which won the 1996 Pulitzer Prize for history and the Bancroft Prize in American History. In 2014, he once again won the Pulitzer Prize for History in his title: The Internal Enemy: Slavery and War in Virginia, 1772-1832.