Executive Power and Soviet Politics: The Rise and Decline of the Soviet State

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M.E. Sharpe, Jan 1, 1992 - Political Science - 281 pages
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Ever since the behavioral revolution reached Communist studies more than 2 decades ago, Western scholarship has tended to ignore the powerful and unwieldy institutional structure of the Soviet government. Today, suddenly, it is clear that the dramatic political and legislative reforms of the Gorbachev years will remain incomplete as long as the issues of state bureaucratic power and executive prerogative are unresolved. This volume, brings together original studies of the Soviet executive under Gorbachev by specialists including Barbara Chotiner, Stephen Fortescue, Brnda Horrigan, Ellen Jones, Wayne Limberg, T.H. Rigby and Louise Shelley. Among the topics covered are the major economic, national security and law enforcement ministries, the presidency, the cabinet and questions of presidential-ministerial, presidential-presidential, legislative-executive and party-state relations.
  

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Contents

The Government in the Soviet Political System
3
PartyState Relations
49
ExecutiveLegislative Relations
83
The Rise of Presidential Power under Gorbachev
106
The Ministry of Finance
129
The Industrial Ministries
143
The Agricultural Ministries
161
The Ministry of Defense
181
The Ministry of Internal Affairs
202
The Rebirth of the Russian State
249
Index
271
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About the author (1992)

Eugene Huskey is professor of political science and director of Russian Studies at Stetson University.

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