The amoral elephant: globalization and the struggle for social justice in the twenty-first century

Front Cover
Monthly Review Press, 2001 - Business & Economics - 224 pages
0 Reviews
In what may well have been the largest popular protest in this country of the last twenty years, more than forty thousand demonstrators in Seattle effectively shut down a World Trade Organization (WTO) conference late last year. Against the backdrop of this historic event, William K. Tabb issues a comprehensive examination of the world capitalist system at the start of the twenty-first century disputing those who see globalization as the steamroller against which the most powerful nations are helpless. It is in fact the most powerful states that have created globalization. The Amoral Elephantexamines the implications of globalization, draws parallels to earlier stages of capitalist development to demonstrate the social burdens arising from the exploding financial markets. Tabb describes how international institutions, most importantly the International Monetary Fund and the WTO have focused on neoliberal goals to erode the welfare state and shift wealth from the poor to the rich. Tabb's reasoning is that if we better understand the world, we will be better prepared to engage in the struggle for progressive social change.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Globalization and the Politics of the TwentyFirst Century
7
From Railroads to Virtual Highways
33
From National Keynesianism to Neoliberalism
51
Copyright

7 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2001)

William K. Tabb is Professor of economics and Professor of political science at Queens college and Professor of political science at the Graduate Center of the City of New York. He is the author of The Postwar Japanese System: Cultural Economy and Economic Transformation (1995) and Restructuring Political Economy: The Great Divide in Economic Thought (1999).