A memoir of Sir John Drummond Hay: P.C., K.C.B., G.C.M.G., sometime minister at the court of Morrocco (Google eBook)

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J. Murray, 1896 - 407 pages
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Page 328 - There was a night lamp in the room. I sat up and listened, looking around the room, but there was no one except my wife, sleeping quietly in bed. I listened for some seconds, expecting to hear footsteps outside, but complete stillness prevailed, so I lay down again, thanking God that the voice which woke me was an hallucination.
Page 328 - She replied, the following post, that in her distress at seeing her husband so dangerously ill, and from being alone in a distant land, she had made use of the precise words which had startled me from sleep, and had repeated them. As it may be of interest for you to receive a corroboration of what I have related, from the persons I have mentioned, who happen to be with me at this date, they also sign, to affirm the accuracy of all I have related. When I resigned, in 1886, I destroyed, unfortunately,...
Page 327 - Mogador with his family, where he was at that time Consul. It was in the month of February. I had lately received good accounts of my son and his family. I was also in perfect health. About 1 am (I forget the exact day in February), whilst sleeping soundly at Tangier, I was woke by hearing distinctly the voice of my daughter-in-law, who was with her husband at Mogodor, saying in a clear but distressed tone of voice, " Oh, I wish papa only knew that Robert is ill.
Page 278 - ... revolt. Agriculture is destroyed, the farmers and peasantry only grow sufficient grain for their own requirements, and rich lands are allowed to lie fallow because the farmers know the crops would be plundered by the governors and sheikhs. Thus it happens with cattle and horses. Breeding is checked, since the man who may become rich through his industry is treated as a criminal, and all his possessions are taken from him, as in the fable the goose is killed to get the golden eggs.
Page 37 - Londonderry was very good-natured, and being much amused at the condition made by the Sultan, consented to put on all her most valuable jewelry. On arrival at the Palace, Reshid Pasha conducted Lady Londonderry into the presence of the Sultan. Her dress glittered with diamonds, pearls, turquoises, and other precious stones. ' Pekkei—good,' said the Sultan (as Lady Londonderry curtseyed), ' she has brought magnificent jewels.
Page 327 - There was a night-lamp in the room. I sat up and listened, looking around the 1 Journal of Society for Psychical Research, March, 1891, p. 40. room, but there was no one except my wife, sleeping quietly in bed. I listened for some seconds, expecting to hear footsteps outside, but complete stillness prevailed, so I lay down again, thanking God that the voice which woke me was...
Page 355 - It would never do for us that France should hold the Straits, the gut of commerce, the passage to India and the East. It is far more likely to be dangerous than if she held the Canal. As a sentinel of the Straits I fire my gun, as a warning, when I know of a move to obtain that object.
Page 346 - Tangier must either remain in the hands of a neutral Power like Morocco, or England must hold it.
Page 277 - The Sultan, looking very grave, replied : ' This is the first time in my life that I have been asked by any man whether I would choose to hear what might give me pain, or even offence, ^or listen to that which may please and flatter me. I select the former.
Page 37 - Pasha having made known to the Sultan that a person had arrived at Constantinople with a wonderful collection of most valuable jewelry, asked whether His Majesty would like to see them. The following conversation is said to have taken place : — Sultan. ' Let the jewelry be brought and prices stated.

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