THE DUBLIN QUARTERLY JOURNAL OD MEDICAL SCIENCE CONSISTING OF ORIGINAL COMMUNICATIONS, REVIEWS, RETROSPECTS AND REPORTSS\ (Google eBook)

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Page vii - GENERAL' RECEIPT-BOOK : comprising a copious Veterinary Formulary and Table of Veterinary Materia Medica ; Patent and Proprietary Medicines, Druggists
Page 334 - The hard infiltration of the subcutaneous and intermuscular areolar tissue forms rounded tumors beneath the skin, varying in size from that of a hazel-nut to that of a...
Page 363 - The good that I would, I do not; the evil that I would not, that I do,
Page 110 - Dissertation on Nature of Virtue," subjoined to " Analogy of Religion." Case of an Impulse to Steal. " There are persons who are moral to the highest degree as to certain duties, but who nevertheless live under the influence of some one vice. In one instance a woman was exemplary in her obedience to every command of the moral law, except one she could not refrain from stealing.
Page x - HALF-YEARLY ABSTRACT OF THE MEDICAL SCIENCES; being a Practical and Analytical Digest of the Contents of the Principal British and Continental Medical Works published in the preceding...
Page 454 - Hassall (Dr.) Food and its Adulterations : Comprising the Reports of the Analytical Sanitary Commission of The Lancet for the Years 1851 to 1854 inclusive, revised and extended.
Page vi - DR. EBEN. WATSON, AM ON THE TOPICAL MEDICATION OF THE LARYNX IN CERTAIN DISEASES OF THE RESPIRATORY AND VOCAL ORGANS.
Page ix - WHAT TO OBSERVE AT THE BEDSIDE AND AFTER DEATH, IN MEDICAL CASES. Published under the authority of the London Society for Medical Observation. A new American, from the second and revised LondoL edition.
Page 371 - Before the fit he complains of being exceedingly sleepy ; without oeing able to sleep, he feels depressed, and experiences slight twitchings in the limbs. During the fit he preserves his consciousness, and knows perfectly well, that in committing a murder, he would be guilty of an atrocious crime. When he is disabled from doing injury, he makes the most frightful contortions and grimaces, singing or talking in rhyme. The fits last from one to two days. When they are over, he cries out, ' Now unbind...
Page 142 - dedicated by permission to the President and Fellows of the Royal College of Physicians in London.

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