Let the Sea Make a Noise...: A History of the North Pacific from Magellan to MacArthur

Front Cover
Harper Collins, Mar 30, 2004 - History - 848 pages
3 Reviews

In this exceptionally innovative work, Walter McDougall projects on a large screen four hundred years of exciting voyages of discovery, pioneering feats, engineering marvels, political plots and business chicanery, racial clashes and brutal wars. It is a chronicle complete with little-known facts and turning points, but always focused on the remarkable people at the center of events, among them the America-loving Japanese ambassador to Washington on the eve of the attack on Pearl Harbor, the Russian builder of the Trans-Siberian Railway, and a Hawaiian queen during the first period of Western competition for the islands.

Let the Sea Make a Noise . . . is a gripping account of the rise and fall of the empires in the last, vast, unexplored corner of the habitable earth -- an area occupying one-sixth of the globe. There is no other book that covers these same subjects in this wealth of detail and with such chronological scope.

  

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Let the Sea Make a Noise...: A History of the North Pacific from Magellan to MacArthur

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

"A stimulating analysis of the interaction of the races and cultures of the North Pacific over the past four centuries," said LJ 's reviewer of Pulitzer Prize winner McDougall's 1993 volume. The book ... Read full review

Review: Let the Sea Make a Noise...: A History of the North Pacific from Magellan to MacArthur

User Review  - Gerry - Goodreads

Great big picture history. Format will be controversial, but it worked for me. Read full review

Contents

Tokyo 1889
352
Vladivostok and Otsu 1891
363
Honolulu 1893
372
Korea 1895
382
Manila and Honolulu 1898
389
The Eighth aha iki
399
North to Alaska 1899
411
Peking 1900
420

Nootka Sound 1790
90
Hokkaido 1792
97
Kealakekua Bay 1794
103
Sitkal799
113
Paris 1803
122
Sakhalin Island 1806
131
The Third aha iki
137
Astoria 1811
146
California and Kauai 1815
152
Washington City 1819
160
St Petersburg 1821
166
Honolulu 1825
173
The Fourth aha iki fi
195
Canton 1839
204
Honolulu 1843
211
Oregon 1844
218
Sonoma 1846
228
CONTENTS
234
The Fifth aha
249
Of Steam and Rails
257
The Sixth aha
263
Edo 1853
274
San Francisco 1860
288
Washington City and Sitka 1867
298
Tokyo 1868
315
The Seventh aha
326
Honolulu 1875
336
Sacramento and Washington 1882
344
Panama City 1903
430
Port Arthur 1904
437
The Ninth aha iki
459
The Tenth aha
467
Korea 1910
483
Peking 1912
490
Panama and Kiaochow 1914
501
Vladivostok and Paris 1919 y
521
Tokyo 1923
535
Seattle to Seattle 1924
549
56
560
Mukden 1931
568
Nanking 1937
579
Nomonhan 1939
590
Pearl Harbor 1941
602
The Twelfth flifl iki
613
Attu and Teheran 1943
639
Saipan 1944
649
Tokyo 1948
667
Korea 1950
680
Americans Burden
694
The Dismissal
705
Acknow7edgmen
718
Sources o Quotations
754
Glossary
775
5an Francisco 1906
789
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 190 - For it is written, Rejoice, thou barren that bearest not; break forth and cry, thou that travailest not: for the desolate hath many more children than she which hath an husband.
Page 215 - God hath made of one blood all nations of men to dwell on the face of the earth...
Page 178 - He shall not fail nor be discouraged, till he have set judgment in the earth: and the isles shall wait for his law.
Page 349 - The United States of America and the Emperor of China cordially recognize the inherent and inalienable right of man to change his home and allegiance...
Page 681 - So far as the military security of other areas in the Pacific is concerned, it must be clear that no person can guarantee these areas against military attack.
Page 397 - Spain's was; and (4) that there was nothing left for us to do but to take them all, and to educate the Filipinos, and uplift and civilize and Christianize them, and by God's grace do the very best we could by them, as our fellow-men for whom Christ also died.
Page 676 - The unfortunate but inescapable fact is that the ominous result of the civil war in China was beyond the control of the Government of the United States.
Page 126 - There is on the globe one single spot the possessor of which is our natural and habitual enemy. It is New Orleans...
Page 529 - China; b. any such monopoly or preference as would deprive the nationals of any other Power of the right of undertaking any legitimate trade or industry in China, or of participating with the Chinese Government, or with any local authority, in any category of public...
Page 397 - That there was nothing left for us to do but to take them all, and to educate the Filipinos, and uplift and civilize and Christianize [ie, Protestantize] them and by God's grace do the very best we could by them, as our fellow men for whom Christ also died.

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About the author (2004)

A professor of history at the University of Pennsylvania, Walter A. McDougall is the author of many books, including the Pulitzer Prize-winning The Heavens and the Earth and Let the Sea Make a Noise. . . . He lives in Pennsylvania with his wife and two teenage children.

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