Vivienne

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Tom Doherty Associates, Nov 19, 2001 - Fiction - 288 pages
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“Expertly crafted. . . . Vivienne is good stuff.”—The Star-Ledger, Newark, NJ

February 1968. The Chinese New Year. The Tet Offensive. Vietcong ambush American units all across South Vietnam.

Meanwhile, back home, reporter Jim Quint covers the escalating antiwar protests, writing stories that brand him a coward and a traitor in the eyes of the military. So it comes as quite a surprise when he receives an invitation to dine at the home of intelligence officer Colonel Del Lambert high in the hills above Honolulu.

After a tense dinner, Lambert orders his Vietnamese wife, Vivienne, to strip for Quint; when she refuses, he bullies her into submission, promising Vivienne to Quint as a gift if he can uncover the secret she’s hiding.

Ensnared in a trap of their own making, Quint, Lambert, and Vivienne are driven by the elemental forces of desire, rage, sacrifice, and, ultimately, hope.

“Tells the tale of a very twisted triangle, something straight out of Tennessee Williams.”—Booklist

“[A] hard-hitting drama. . . . Builds sexual urgency and suspense all the way.”—Publishers Weekly

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About the author (2001)

Richard Hoyt, a graduate of the University of Oregon, is a former fellow of the Washington Journalism Center and holds a Ph.D. in American studies from the University of Hawaii. He served as U.S. army counterintelligence agent, wrote for daily newspapers in Honolulu, and was a stringer for Newsweek magazine. He taught journalism at the University of Maryland and at Lewis and Clark College, Portland, Or.

Hoyt is the author of the John Denson mysteries, the James Burlane thrillers and numerous other novels of adventure, espionage and suspense including two under the pseudonym of Nicholas van Pelt. In researching and writing in more than two dozen countries in Europe, Latin America, and Asia, he has ridden trains across the Soviet Union and riverboats down the Amazon. He now lives in the Philippines.

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