Shinto: The Way Home

Front Cover
University of Hawaii Press, Jan 1, 2004 - Religion - 184 pages
2 Reviews
Nine out of ten Japanese claim some affiliation with Shinto, but in the West the religion remains the least studied of the major Asian spiritual traditions. It is so interlaced with Japanese cultural values and practices that scholarly studies usually focus on only one of its dimensions: Shinto as a nature religion, an imperial state religion, a primal religion, or a folk amalgam of practices and beliefs. Thomas Kasulis' fresh approach to Shinto explains with clarity and economy how these different aspects interrelate. As a philosopher of religion, he first analyzes the experiential aspect of Shinto spirituality underlying its various ideas and practices. Second, as a historian of Japanese thought, he sketches several major developments in Shinto doctrines and institutions from prehistory to the present, showing how its interactions with Buddhism, Confucianism, and nationalism influenced its expression in different times and contexts. In Shinto's idiosyncratic history, Kasulis finds the explicit interplay between two forms of spirituality: the existential and the essentialist. Although the dynamic between the two is particularly striking and accessible in the study of S

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - bezoar44 - LibraryThing

This short (170 page) monograph provides a thoughtful and sympathetic introduction to Shinto; it started modestly but grew on me steadily. The first chapter discusses Shinto as a religious worldview ... Read full review

Review: Shinto: The Way Home (Dimensions of Asian Spirituality)

User Review  - Zofia Ariadna - Goodreads

Very interesting. Still prefer my religion though. :) Read full review

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About the author (2004)

Kasulis teaches in the Department of Comparative Studies at Ohio State University.

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