Marie Curie: And the Science of Radioactivity

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Oxford University Press, Aug 1, 1996 - Juvenile Nonfiction - 109 pages
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Marie Curie discovered radium and went on to lead the scientific community in studying the theory behind and the uses of radioactivity. She left a vast legacy to future scientists through her research, her teaching, and her contributions to the welfare of humankind. She was the first person to win two Nobel Prizes, yet upon her death in 1934, Albert Einstein was moved to say, "Marie Curie is, of all celebrated beings, the only one whom fame has not corrupted." She was a physicist, a wife and mother, and a groundbreaking professional woman. This biography is an inspirational and exciting story of scientific discovery and personal commitment.
  

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Contents

Preface
7
Chapter 1 Preparation for Future Work
9
Chapter 2 The Heroic Period
23
Chapter 3 The Best and Happiest Years
35
Chapter 4 A Growing Notoriety
51
Chapter 5 Honor Under Cruel Circumstances
60
Chapter 6 Grave Illness
69
Chapter 7 The Hospital Life of Those Years
80
Chapter 8 A Suitable Laboratory
91
Chronology
104
Further Reading
106
Index
108
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About the author (1996)

Naomi Pasachoff is at Williams College.

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