The Pub in Literature: England's Altered State

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Manchester University Press, 2000 - History - 294 pages
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If English Literature begins with Chaucer's Canterbury Tales then it begins in a pub, The Tabard. Steven Earnshaw traces the many roles of the drinking house in Literature from Chaucer's time to the end of the 20th century, taking in the better-known hostelries, such as Hal's and Falstaff's Boar's Head in Henry IV, the numerous inns and public houses of Dickens, and the Black Cross in Martin Amis' London Fields. The author also discusses lesser-known works where the drinking place is central.
  

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Contents

Introduction
1
Early doors
18
The Falstaffian state
45
Wonderfull yeares
69
Pepys pissed
90
Jovial brutal vulgar graphic Ned Ward
110
Scene An Inn And horrible gin
133
Where did the Romantics drink?
160
Dickens
188
Of Rainbows and Fingers
208
Our mutual wasteland
234
Kegged
257
Bibliography
274
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

Steven Earnshaw is Lecturer in English Studies at Sheffield Hallam University.

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