Private correspondence of Sarah, duchess of Marlborough, illustrative of the court and times of queen Anne, with her sketches and opinions of her contempories, and the select correspondence of John, duke of Marlborough (Google eBook)

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1838
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Page 194 - tis all a cheat, Yet, fooled with hope, men favour the deceit ; Trust on, and think to-morrow will repay ; To-morrow's falser than the former day ; Lies worse ; and, while it says we shall be blest With some new joys, cuts off what we possest.
Page 195 - All his talents lie in things only natural in boys of fifteen years old, and he is about two and fifty ; to get people into his garden and wet them with squirts, and to invite people to his country-houses, and put things into their beds to make them itch, and twenty such pretty fancies like...
Page 120 - Upon which account it was a sort of unhappiness to her that she naturally loved to have a great crowd come to her ; for when they were come to Court, she never cared to have them come in to her nor to go out herself to them, having little to say to them but that it was either hot or cold, and little to enquire of them, but how long they had been in town or the like weighty matters.
Page 187 - His daily food was a small quantity of asses' milk and a flour biscuit. Once a week he indulged himself with eating an apple ; he used emetics daily. Mr. Pope and he were once friends ; but they quarrelled, and persecuted each other with virulent satire. Pope, knowing the abstemious regimen which Lord Hervey observed, was so ungenerous as to call him a mere cheese-curd of asses
Page 207 - I could not help wishing that we had had his assistance in the opposition ; for I could easily forgive him all the slaps he has given me and the Duke of Marlborough, and have thanked him heartily whenever he would please to do good. I never saw him in my life ; and though his writings have entertained me very much, yet I see he writes sometimes for interest ; for in his books he gives my Lord Oxford as great a character as if he was speaking of Socrates or Marcus Antoninus. But when I am dead, the...
Page 196 - He had other pretty fancies, not mentioned in the memoranda of his mother-in-law : he did good without ostentation. His vast benevolence of soul is not recorded by Pope ; but it will be remembered while there is any tradition of human kindness and charity in England.
Page 77 - said I. ' Come, come,' replied he, ' you must have heard what the duchess has done, and the message sent by Mrs. Cooper.' In short, the queen is so angry, that she says she will build no house for the Duke of Marlborough, when the duchess has pulled hers to pieces, taken away the very slabs out of the chimneys, thrown away the keys, and said they might buy more for ten shillings...
Page 223 - Robert himself, in a conversation with Sandys, was, that they might, perhaps, get the better of him, but he was sure no other Minister would ever be able to stand so long as he had done twenty years.* The first effect of these motions seemed to be the securing of Walpole in power.
Page 187 - This benefactress was no other than La Belle Stuart of the Comte de Grammont ; and her endowment was not a proper object of satire. The real truth was, that she left annuities to certain female friends, with the burden of maintaining some of her cats ; a delicate way of providing for poor, and, probably, proud gentlewomen, without making them feel that they owed their livelihood to her mere liberality.
Page 206 - Dean Swift gives the most exact account of kings, ministers, bishops and the courts of justice that is possible to be writ. He has certainly a vast deal of wit ; and since he could contribute so much to the pulling down the most honest and best-intentioned ministry that ever I knew, with the help only of Abigail and one or two more, and has certainly stopped the finishing stroke to ruin the Irish in the project of the halfpence, in spite of all the ministry could do, I could not help wishing that...

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