The New microcosm, ed. by the senior class of Manchester school (Google eBook)

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Page 75 - Appals the gazing mourner's heart, As if to him it could impart The doom he dreads, yet dwells upon ; Yes, but for these, and these alone, Some moments, ay, one treacherous hour, He still might doubt the tyrant's power; So fair, so calm, so softly sealed, The first, last look by death revealed...
Page 28 - ... action, had he related them in the same order that they happened,) he cast them into the fifth, sixth, and seventh books, by way of episode to this noble poem. Aristotle himself allows that Homer has nothing to boast of as to the unity of his fable...
Page 10 - Imagination fondly stoops to trace The parlour splendours of that festive place; The white-washed wall, the nicely sanded floor, The varnished clock that clicked behind the door; The chest contrived a double debt to pay, A bed by night, a chest of drawers by day; The pictures placed for ornament and use, The twelve good rules, the royal game of goose...
Page 158 - Or the seven stars to light you, Or the polar ray to right you ; But you never may behold Little John, or Robin bold ; Never one, of all the clan...
Page 28 - ... rather than as parts of the action. On the contrary, the poem which we have now under our consideration hath no other episodes than such as naturally arise from the subject...
Page 95 - Had reel'd then hasten all to bed. The mistress sees that lazy Kate The happing coal on kitchen grate Has laid while master goes throughout, Sees shutters fast, the mastiff out, - The candles safe, the hearths all clear, And nought from thieves or fire to fear ; Then both to bed together creep, And join the general troop of sleep.
Page 176 - He fed on poisons, and they had no power, But were a kind of nutriment; he lived Through that which had been death to many men, And made him friends of mountains: with the stars And the quick Spirit of the Universe He held his dialogues; and they did teach To him the magic of their mysteries ; To him the book of Night was...
Page 160 - ... if she directs her thoughts to pursuits which aspire to serve, and which never fail to elevate. Educating her for the Harem, but calling on her for the practices of the Portico, man expects from his odalisque the firmness of the stoic, and demands from his servant the exercise of those virtues which, placing the elite of his own sex at the head of its muster-roll, give immortality to the master. He tells her "that obscurity is her true glory, insignificance her distinction, ignorance her lot,...
Page 77 - A critic, analysing the poetical character of Milton, says, he has ' sublimity in the highest degree ; beauty in an equal degree ; pathos next to the highest ; perfect character in the conception of Satan, of Adam, and Eve ; fancy, learning, vividness of description, stateliness, decorum. His style is elaborate and powerful, and his versification, with occasional harshness and affectation, superior in variety and harmony to all other blank verse ; it has the effect of a piece of fine music.
Page 27 - THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT This is the farmer sowing his corn, That kept the cock that crowed in the morn, That waked the priest all shaven and shorn, That married the man all tattered and torn, That kissed the maiden all forlorn, That milked the cow with the crumpled horn, That tossed the dog That worried the cat That killed the rat That ate the malt That lay in the house that Jack built.

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