Heidi

Front Cover
Plain Label Books, Aug 30, 2007 - Fiction - 184 pages
26 Reviews
Heidi has captivated and enthralled readers since it was first published. Heidi, an orphan, has to move in with her stern, demanding grandfather in the Swiss Alps, and just as she begins to feel at home she finds herself back in a city caring for a sick relative. This classic coming of age story explores the balance between freedom and family responsibilities. The joyously triumphant resolution will stays with the reader for a long time.
  

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - yukkii - LibraryThing

Heidi is a girl lived with his Grandfather in a mountain, but her aunt tried to take her to a town, but she want to go back to the mountain,,, "Heidi" is a very famous story for a long time around the world. In Japan, on the TV we could watch the Heidi's anime. I want to visit to Switzerland. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - pon123 - LibraryThing

Heidi iwas taken in by her grandfather living at the Alps. She grown up and larned many things through a living with grandfather and friends in the Alps. This story is very famous. I also watched animation when I was a child. Eery time I am impressed the last scene. Read full review

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Page 303 - But the father said to his servants, " Bring forth the best robe, and put it on him; and put a ring on his hand, and shoes on his feet; and bring hither the fatted calf, and kill it; and let us eat, and be merry: for this, my son, was dead, and is alive again; he was lost, and is found.
Page 302 - And he arose, and came to his father. But when he was yet a great way off, his father saw him, and had compassion, and ran, and fell on his neck, and kissed him. And the son said to him, Father, I have sinned against heaven, and in your sight, and I am no longer worthy to be called your son.
Page 217 - ... believed what Peter said; but now you must believe what I tell you and I tell you that you can learn to read in a very little while, as many other children do, who are made like you and not like Peter. And now hear what comes after you see that picture with the shepherd and the animals well, as soon as you are able to read you shall have that book for your own, and then you will know all about the sheep and the goats, and what the shepherd did, and the wonderful things that happened...
Page 71 - Peter! Peter! everything is on fire! All the rocks are burning, and the great snow mountain and the sky! O look, look! the high rock up there is red with flame! O the beautiful, fiery snow! Stand up, Peter! See, the fire has reached the great bird's nest! look at the rocks! look at the fir trees! Everything, everything is on fire!" "It is always like that," said Peter composedly, continuing to peel his stick; "but it is not really fire.
Page 45 - Then you must have some more," and the old man filled her bowl again to the brim and set it before the child, who was now hungrily beginning her bread having first spread it with the cheese, which after being toasted was soft as butter; the two together tasted deliciously, and the child looked the picture of content as she sat eating, and at intervals taking further draughts of milk. The meal being over, the grandfather went outside to put the goatshed in order, and Heidi watched with interest while...
Page 406 - Off now as quickly as you can, off to the mountain.' He is most impatient about our going. You cannot think how much he enjoyed himself when he was with you! He has called nearly every day this winter, and each time he has come in to my room and said he must tell me about everything again. And then he sits down and describes all he did with you and the...
Page 72 - It gets like that of itself," explained Peter. "Look, look!" cried Heidi in fresh excitement, "now they have turned all rose color! Look at that one covered with snow, and that with the high, pointed rocks! What do you call them?" "Mountains have not any names," he answered. "O how beautiful, look at the crimson snow! And up there on the rocks there are ever so many roses! Oh! now they are turning grey! Oh! oh! now all the color has died away! it's all gone, Peter." And Heidi sat down on the ground...
Page 287 - ... Little Swan! Little Bear! do you know me again?" And the animals evidently recognized her voice at once, for they began rubbing their heads against her and bleating loudly as if for joy, and as she called the other goats by name one after the other, they all came scampering towards her helter- skelter and crowding round her. The impatient Greenfinch sprang into the air and over two of her companions in order to get nearer, and even the shy little Snowflake butted the Great Turk out of her way...
Page 363 - ... angry pantomime. September had drawn to its close, and now one morning the doctor appeared looking less cheerful than usual. It was his last day, he said, as he must return to Frankfurt, but he was grieved at having to say good-bye to the mountain, which he had begun to feel quite like home. Alm-Uncle, on his side, greatly regretted the departure of his guest, and Heidi had been now accustomed for so long to see her good friend every day that she could hardly believe the time had suddenly come...
Page 19 - And what happened to Tobias?' asked Barbel, who was listening with deep interest. 'Wait a moment, I am coming to that, but I cannot tell you everything at once," replied Dete. "Tobias was taught his trade in Mels, and when he had served his apprenticeship he came back to Dorfli and married my sister Adelaide. They had always been fond of one another, and they got on very well together after they were married. But their happiness did not last long. Her husband met with his death only two years after...

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About the author (2007)

Johanna Spyri (1827-1901), a lifelong resident of Switzerland, began to write stories to earn money for refugees from the Franco-Prussian War. "Heidi", her first novel, was also her most successful, though she wrote many other children's books. Spyri's firm belief in the natural innocence of children and their ability to grow up into decent, caring adults if left to their own devices was remarkably similar to that of her Danish contemporary, Hans Christian Andersen.

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