Hard Time: 50 to Life

Front Cover
DC Comics, Dec 1, 2004 - Comics & Graphic Novels - 144 pages
8 Reviews
He can escape his body, but his body can't escape prison! A high-school shooting costs four students their lives, and 15-year-old Ethan Chiles his future. Now he's got 50 years of hard time to look forward to. But Something powerful has been growing within Ethan, and on the day of his sentencing, it escapes at last. It will change a life that has already been completely changed. It will follow him into the savage setting of a maximum-security prison, where each day is a struggle for survival. Will it be a source of massive power, a chance for redemption, or the cruelest of curses?

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Review: Hard Time: 50 to Life

User Review  - Ming Siu - Goodreads

Very solid series intro, with compelling characters and a unique situation. Sadly, the series didn't last long. But I'll be picking up the rest of it for sure. Read full review

Review: Hard Time: 50 to Life

User Review  - Roger Buck - Goodreads

For a comic book, this is brilliant but disturbing. Steve Gerber possessed real insight into the decadence of modern society. Alas, Steve Gerber's poor heart was profoundly afflicted by the pain of ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
Section 2
Section 3

6 other sections not shown

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About the author (2004)

Comic book writer and creator Steve Gerber was born in St. Louis, Missouri on September 20, 1947. After receiving a bachelor's degree in communication from Saint Louis University in 1969, he worked as an advertising copywriter before joining Marvel Comics as an associate editor and writer in 1972. He began by writing stories for Daredevil, Sub-Mariner, and other superhero titles. He created Howard the Duck, Omega the Unknown, and the animated series Thundarr the Barbarian. Howard the Duck No. 1 was published in 1976 and Gerber wrote the first 27 issues. After he was fired from Marvel in the late 1970s, he sued the company for ownership of the Howard the Duck character. The case was settled out of court with Marvel retaining the rights to the character and Gerber receiving an undisclosed sum. This suit was one of the first cases to bring the issue of creators' rights to the attention of the public. In 1986, Howard the Duck was released as a live-action film produced by George Lucas. Gerber also wrote for animated television series like G.I. Joe and Dungeons and Dragons. He died due to complications of pulmonary fibrosis on February 10, 2008.

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