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Books Books 1 - 10 of 137 on If such do occur, can we doubt (remembering that many more individuals are born than....  
" If such do occur, can we doubt (remembering that many more individuals are born than can possibly survive) that individuals having any advantage, however slight, over others, would have the best chance of surviving and of procreating their kind? On the... "
The Encyclopaedia Britannica: a dictionary of arts, sciences, and general ... - Page 79
edited by - 1890
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The National Review, Volume 10

Richard Holt Hutton, Walter Bagehot - 1860
...others, would have the best chance of surviving, and of propagating their kind ? On the other hand, we may feel sure that any variation in the least degree injurious would be rigidly destroyed. This preservation of favourable variations, and the rejection of injurious variations,...
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On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection; Or, The Preservation ...

Charles Darwin - Evolution - 1861 - 440 pages
...over others, would have the best chance of surviving and of procreating their kind? On the other hand, we may feel sure that any variation in the least degree injurious would be rigidly destroyed. This preservation of favourable variations and the rejection of injurious variations,...
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On the origin of species by means of natural selection: or, The preservation ...

Charles Darwin - Evolution (Biology) - 1864 - 458 pages
...others, would have the best chance of surviving and of procreating their .kind? lOn the other hand, we may feel sure that any variation [in the least degree injurious would be rigidly destroyed. This preservation of favqujable variations and -the reiegtion of injurious _vg,riatioiis,...
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Half-hours with Freethinkers

Charles Bradleigh - Free thought - 1865
...over others, would have the best chance of surviving and procreating their kind? On the other hand, we may feel sure that any variation, in the least degree injurious, would be rigidly destroyed. The preservation of favourable variations and the rejection of injurious variations,...
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Chambers's Encyclopædia: A Dictionary of Universal Knowledge, Volume 9

Encyclopedias and dictionaries - 1868
...others, would have the best chance of surviving and of procreating their kind ? On the other hand, we may feel sure that any variation in the least degree injurious would be rigidly destroyed. This preservation of favourable variations and the rejection of _ SPECIES. unfavourable...
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Chambers's encyclopaedia: a dictionary of universal knowledge for the people ...

Encyclopedias and dictionaries - 1869
...over others, would have the best chanre of surviving and of procreating their kind? On the other hand, we may feel sure that any variation in the least degree injurious would be rigidly destroyed. This preservation of favourable variations and the rejection of SPECIES. unfavourable...
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Chambers's Encyclopædia: A Dictionary of Universal Knowledge for ..., Volume 9

Ephraim Chambers - Encyclopedias and dictionaries - 1870
...others, would have the best chance of surviving and of procreating their kind Î On the other hand, we may feel sure that any variation in the least degree injurious would Ix? rigidly destroyed. This preservation of favourable variations and the rejection of •г tbe work...
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Chambers's encyclopædia, Volume 9

Chambers W. and R., ltd - 1874
...others, would have the best chance of surviving and of procreating their kind ? On the other hand, we may feel sure that any variation in the least degree injurious would be rigidly destroyed. This preservation of favourable variations and the rejection of unfavourable variations,...
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The Problem of Human Life: Embracing the "evolution of Sound" and "evolution ...

Alexander Wilford Hall - Evolution - 1880 - 512 pages
..."destruction" or atrophy of every organ which is in any degree "injurious." He says: — "On the other hand we may feel sure that any variation in the least degree injurious would be rigidly destroyed. [Why has it not "rigidly" destroyed the camel's hump?] This preservation of favorable...
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