Agglomeration Economics (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Edward L. Glaeser
University of Chicago Press, Apr 15, 2010 - Business & Economics - 376 pages
0 Reviews
When firms and people are located near each other in cities and in industrial clusters, they benefit in various ways, including by reducing the costs of exchanging goods and ideas. One might assume that these benefits would become less important as transportation and communication costs fall. Paradoxically, however, cities have become increasingly important, and even within cities industrial clusters remain vital.

Agglomeration Economics brings together a group of essays that examine the reasons why economic activity continues to cluster together despite the falling costs of moving goods and transmitting information. The studies cover a wide range of topics and approach the economics of agglomeration from different angles. Together they advance our understanding of agglomeration and its implications for a globalized world.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
1
1 Estimating Agglomeration Economies with History Geology and Worker Effects
15
Facts and Theories
67
Zipfs Law?
105
An Empirical Investigation
133
5 Urbanization Agglomeration and Coagglomeration of Service Industries
151
Demographics and Retail Product Geography
181
7 Understanding Agglomerations in Health Care
211
8 The Agglomeration of US Ethnic Inventors
237
Agglomeration Industrial Organization and Entrepreneurship
277
10 Did the Death of Distance Hurt Detroit and Help New York?
303
11 New Evidence on Trends in the Cost of Urban Agglomeration
339
Contributors
355
Author Index
357
Subject Index
361
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2010)

Edward L. Glaeser is the Fred and Eleanor Glimp Professor of Economics at Harvard University, where he also serves as director of the Taubman Center for State and Local Government and director of the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston. He is a research associate and director of the Urban Economics working group at the NBER.