The principles of social evolution

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Oxford University Press, Incorporated, 1986 - Social Science - 412 pages
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Dispelling the general assumption that social institutions survive because of their sophisticated adaptive advantages, this ground-breaking work asserts that the commonest customs and institutions may endure because of their very simplicity or as a result of simple human proclivity. Using religious, military, and kinship institutions to illustrate this argument, the author shows that a precise combination of these factors may lead to the emergence of new forms of social evolution.

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User Review  - thcson - LibraryThing

I'm glad this was the first book I read on social evolution. The author does a great job of explaining why the darwinian theory of variation and selection can not be applied directly to social ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
Darwinism and Social Evolution
29
The Survival of the Mediocre
81
Copyright

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