The Rise and Fall of the American Teenager

Front Cover
Harper Collins, Sep 19, 2000 - Social Science - 336 pages
14 Reviews

In the groundbreaking work, Thomas Hine examines the American teenager as a social invention shaped by the needs of the twentieth century. With intelligence, insight, imagination, and humorm he traces the culture of youth in America-from the spiritual trials of young Puritans and the vision quests of Native Americans to the media-blitzed consumerism of contempory thirteen-to-nineteen -year-olds. The resulting study is a glorious appreciation of youth that challenges us to confront our sterotypesm, rethink our expectations, and consider anew the lives of those individuals who are blessing, our bane, and our future.

  

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
6
4 stars
3
3 stars
3
2 stars
2
1 star
0

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - JWarren42 - LibraryThing

A fantastic book on the history of the concept of teenager-ness. The only bad thing I have to say about the book is also one of its biggest strengths: it moves very quickly through the historical ... Read full review

Review: The Rise and Fall of the American Teenager

User Review  - Susan Bazzett-griffith - Goodreads

Pros: The historical and sociological research in this book is incredibly impressive. I definitely learned a lot about our nation's views on youth and youth culture throughout the last two centuries ... Read full review

Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
The Teenage Mystique
10
Only a Phase?
27
THREE
43
Family Values
57
FIVE
64
Declarations of Independence
76
Counting on the Children
120
NINE
156
ELEVEN
199
TWELVE
225
Boom and Aftershocks
249
Goths in Tomorrowland
274
FIFTEEN
296
SOURCES AND FURTHER READING
305
INDEX
315

EIGHT
128
The Invention of High School
138

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2000)

Thomas Hine, the author of four previous books, including Populuxe and The Total Package, is a writer on culture, history, and design. He is a columnist for Philadelphia Magazine and a contributor to the Atlantic Monthly, Martha Stewart Living, Architectural Record, the Washington Post, the New York Times, and other publications. He Lives in Philadelphia.

Bibliographic information