Early London Theatres: In the Fields (Google eBook)

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E. Stock, 1894 - Theater - 298 pages
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Page 195 - I loved the man, and do honour his memory (on this side Idolatry) as much as any). He was (indeed) honest, and of an open and free nature : had an excellent Phantsie ; brave notions, and gentle expressions...
Page 87 - On this unworthy scaffold to bring forth So great an object: can this cockpit hold The vasty fields of France? or may we cram Within this wooden O the very casques That did affright the air at Agincourt?
Page 195 - I remember the players have often mentioned it as an honour to Shakespeare, that in his writing (whatsoever he penned) he never blotted out a line. My answer hath been ' Would he had blotted a thousand ! ' ; which they thought a malevolent speech.
Page 162 - ... of ten thousand spectators at least (at several times), who in the tragedian that represents his person imagine they behold him fresh bleeding.
Page 10 - Abay gates, and when the first pagiante was played, it was wheeled to the highe crosse before the mayor, and so to every streete, and soe every streete had a pagiant playinge before them at one time, till all the pagiantes for the daye appoynted...
Page 262 - To this entertainment there often follows that of whipping a blinded Bear, which is performed by five or six men, standing circularly, with whips, which they exercise upon him without any mercy, as he cannot escape from them because of his chain. He defends himself with all his force and skill, throwing down all who come within his reach, and are not quite active enough to get out of it, and tearing the Whips out of their hands and breaking them.
Page 223 - O, it offends me to the soul, to hear a robustious, periwigpated fellow tear a passion to tatters, to very rags, to split the ears of the groundlings; who, for the most part, are capable of nothing but inexplicable dumb shows, and noise.
Page 276 - A strange fish! Were I in England now, as once I was, and had but this fish painted, not a holiday fool there but would give a piece of silver: there would this monster make a man; any strange beast there makes a man: when they will not give a doit to relieve a lame beggar, they will lay out ten to see a dead Indian.
Page 21 - The country people flock from all sides, many miles off, to heare and see it, for they have therein devils and devices, to delight as well the eye as the...
Page 164 - ... supposes he is as well able to bombast out a blank verse as the best of you; and being an absolute Johannes factotum, is in his own conceit the only Shake-scene in a country.

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