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Books Books 1 - 10 of 180 on ... let me careless and unthoughtful lying, Hear the soft winds above me flying With....  
" ... let me careless and unthoughtful lying, Hear the soft winds above me flying With all their wanton boughs dispute, And the more tuneful birds to both replying, Nor be myself too mute. A silver stream shall roll his waters near, Gilt with the sunbeams... "
The Penny Magazine of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge - Page 60
1834
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The Art of English Poetry Containing: Rules for making verses. A collection ...

Edward Bysshe - English language - 1710 - 554 pages
...Before the branchy Head of Numbers three Sprung from the Trunck of one. Ah ! wretched and too folitary He, ' Who loves not his own Company ! He'll feel the Weight oft ev'ry Day, Unlefs he call in Sin or Vanity, To help to bear't away. . Cow/.' For Solitude fometimes...
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The Complete Art of Poetry ...

Charles Gildon - English poetry - 1718
...Before the branchy Head of Numbers thrte Sprung from the Trunk of one. Ah ! wretched and too folitary He, Who loves not his own Company ! He'll feel the Weight oft ev'ry Day, Unlefs he call in Sin or Vanity, To help to bear't aw.iy. Coal. For Solitude fometimes is...
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No Cross, No Crown: A Discourse Shewing the Nature and Discipline of the ...

William Penn - Christian life - 1771 - 495 pages
...Sight diflurb his Reft, ' By Fools defir'd, by wicked Men pofleft. * Ah wretched, and too folitary he, ' Who loves not his own Company ! ' He'll feel the Weight oft many a Day,( ' Unlefs he call in Sin or Vanity * To help to bear't away.' Out of Martial he gives- us this following...
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Select works of Mr. A. Cowley: in two volumes, Volume 2

Abraham Cowley, Richard Hurd - English poetry - 1772
...And fee how prettily they fmile, and hear How prettily they talk. 6. Ah wretched, and too folitary he, Who loves not his own company ! He'll feel the weight oft many a day, Unlefs he call in fin or vanity To help to bear't away. 7Oh Solitude, firft ftate of human-kind] Which...
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The Select Works of William Penn....

William Penn - Society of Friends - 1782
...inconveniences that wait He fees (nor doth the fight diftu'rb his reft) By Fools defir'd, by Wicked men pofleft. Ah wretched, and too Solitary, he Who loves not his...own Company: He'll feel the weight oft many a day, Unlefs he call in fin or vanity To help to bear't away. Out of Martial, he gives us this following...
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The Select Works of William Penn....

William Penn - Society of Friends - 1782
...fight difturb his reft) By Fools defir'd, by Wicked men pofleft. Ah wretched, and too Solitary, hs Who loves not his own Company : He'll feel the weight oft many a day, Unlefs he call in fin or vanity To help to bear't away. Out of Martial, he gives us this following...
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The Life of a Lover: In a Series of Letters, Volume 5

Sophia Lee - 1804
...considering the past or the future : nor did I ever need an assiduous somebody to steal me from myself: Ah ! wretched, and too solitary, he Who loves not his own company ! He'll feel the weight oft ev'ry day, Unless lie call in sin or vanity ; says a poet who is almost buried under his own luxuriance....
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The Works of Abraham Cowley, Volume 3

Abraham Cowley, Samuel Johnson, John Aikin - English literature - 1806
...stream shall roll his waters near, Gilt with the sun-beams here and there ; On whose enamel'd bank I 'II walk, And see how prettily they smile, and hear How...and too solitary he, Who loves not his own company} He '11 feel the weight of 't many a day, Unless he call in sin or vanity To help to bear 't away. Oh...
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The Poetical Preceptor; Or, A Collection of Select Pieces of Poetry ...

English poetry - 1806 - 380 pages
...stream shall roll his waters near, Gilt with the sun-beams here and there, On whose enamell'd bank I'll walk, And see how prettily they smile, and hear How prettily they talk,. VI. Ah wretched and too solitary he, Who loves not his own company ! He'll feel the weight oft many...
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No Cross, No Crown: A Discourse Shewing the Nature and Discipline of the ...

William Penn - Christian life - 1807 - 370 pages
...and of state, He sees (nor doth the sight disturb his rest) By Fools desir'd, by Wicked men possest. Ah wretched, and too Solitary, he Who loves not his...Unless he call in sin or vanity To help to bear't away. , Out of Martial, he gives us this following epigram which he makes his by Translation and Choice,...
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